A new Deutsche Welle poll surveying Germans ages 18-29 finds 90 percent think German unification was so successful it should be a model for other countries. Not surprisingly, older generations see it as a work in progress.

Across Germany and the U.S., people are talking about the effects of  the unification and how it could be better. A program beginning Sunday at the University of Cincinnati is no exception.

This Sunday marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. On November 9, 1989, thousands of Berliners from both East and West climbed over the wall, others went through the border crossing, still others began to physically chip away at the wall that had divided East and West since 1961. Joining us to discuss the historic event, and its impact on world politics, is former U.S. Ambassador to NATO William Howard Taft, IV, and Richard E. Schade, professor emeritus of German Studies at the University of Cincinnati.

William Howard Taft, IV and Herbert Quelle, consul general, Federal Republic of Germany, will be at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this Sunday, November 9, for a program commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Center has been home to a section of the Berlin Wall since 2010, in view of the Ohio River. Click here for information on the free event, or to RSVP call 513-333-7739.


  Last month, revelations the U.S. National Security Agency may have tapped German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cell phone caused an uproar. Now Washington and Berlin are discussing new rules to govern dealings between their spy agencies. To gain some insight into what Germans think about personal privacy and international spying, WVXU’s Ann Thompson talked with German broadcaster Uwe Schulz, who recently visited Cincinnati.

Author Richard Lucas joins Mark Perzel to discuss his recent book, Axis Sally: The American Voice of Nazi Germany. It’s the true story of a Maine-born, Ohio-bred woman who went to Hitler’s Germany to study music, fell in love, and became a famed radio propagandist for the war.