Gay Marriage

Baltimore Sun

Federal Judge Timothy Black has decided to issue a permanent injunction in the case of John Arthur and Jim Obergefell, and William Ives and David Mitchener, meaning same-sex unions have to be recognized on death certificates in Ohio. The Attorney General's Office says it will appeal.

Baltimore Sun

A terminally ill Cincinnati man, who traveled to Maryland to marry his partner, has died. John Arthur married Jim Obergefell in July on the tarmac because Arthur, who had ALS, was too sick to get off his stretcher.

Court case continues

Shortly after they married, the couple filed a federal lawsuit challenging Ohio's marriage law, in part so they could be buried together in Arthur's family plot.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

  A Federal Judge in Cincinnati issued a temporary restraining order which will allow a Cincinnati gay couple who were married in Maryland to have their marriage recognized in Ohio. Maryanne Zeleznik talks with the couple’s attorney, Al Gehardstein, about  what the case could mean for other gay couples in the state.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Update: Judge Black has granted the temporary restraining order. This means Ohio is now prohibited, in the event of Arthur's death, from issuing a death certificate that doesn't indicate that he was married and name his spouse.

Baltimore Sun

Update: U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Black has scheduled a hearing Monday at 1:30 for this case. Attorneys for Jim Obergefell and John Arthur and attorneys from the Ohio Attorney General's Office will present their case.

Round one in the battle took place in November 2004, when 62 percent of Ohioans voted in favor of a constitutional ban.


Round two could be right around the corner, possibly in November 2014, if FreedomOhio, a pro-gay marriage group, succeeds in getting a new constitutional amendment on the ballot.


FreedomOhio had a good week.

Gay marriage and guns.


Two issues, so completely different from one another, and yet they have defined Ohio’s junior senator, Rob Portman, in 2013.


Pundits and politicians alike are pondering how the Terrace Park Republican’s positions on these hot-button issues will impact his chances for re-election in 2016.


2016 seems to be a long way away; but, in politics, it is never too early to start thinking about the next election.

U.S. Sen Rob Portman's son, Will, wrote a column in today's Yale Daily News, explaining in great detail how he decided to "come out of the closet" about being gay; and how his father reacted.

The junior senator from Ohio learned his son was gay two years ago. Earlier this month, Portman came out in favor of gay marriage, the only Republican senator who has done so.

Would the constitutional amendment banning gay marriage passed by an overwhelming majority of Ohioans in 2004 pass if it were on the ballot today?
 

We may soon find out.


We went through an entire presidential election cycle with barely a peep from the candidates on social issues such as gay marriage.


Now, though, the debate over gay marriage is front and center in Ohio.

Official Portrait

CNN is reporting Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio now supports gay marriage.  Portman says he's had a change of heart since learning one of his sons is gay.  See the story here. 

In an editorial in the Columbus Dispatch, Portman writes:

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