gardening

  Temperatures in the 90's one week, then it gets unseasonably cool, then we go days without a drop of rain followed by heavy downpours, and then there are the molds, insects, deer, moles and other critters to contend with. Many people consider gardening and yard work relaxing and enjoyable, but maintaining gardens and landscapes around here takes time, effort and experience.

Provided, Cincinnati Parks

The ever-popular Krohn Conservatory butterfly show opened last week, “Pura Vida: Butterflies of Costa Rica” runs through June 22. Krohn General Manager Andrea Schepmann and Regina Edwards, aka "the Bug Lady" at Cincinnati Parks, discuss this year’s Krohn show, and what went into creating “Pura Vida,” a tropical hideaway of exotic plants, cascading waterfalls, colorful parrot fish, mysterious stone sculptures, and 16,000 butterflies.

  It has been a long, long winter, and many of us can’t wait to get out and get our yards and gardens in shape. Campbell County Horticultural Extension Agent David Koester and Peter Huttinger, neighborhood garden coordinator with the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati, share tips and advice on what to do now to give your yard and garden a solid start for the growing season.

Karen Zanger / Side Streams

If all goes according to plan, there will be 500 vegetable-producing gardens in Madisonville this spring.

Organizers of the 500 Gardens Project want to make sure nobody has to walk further than their own yard to taste vine-ripened tomatoes, peppers and zucchini. Without a car, many residents cannot get to a grocery store easily.

The goal is that one in ten households plant a garden with the help of volunteers.

To get a garden here's what has to happen:

Winter Gardening

Nov 5, 2013

Tree Releaf 2013

Sep 8, 2013
Cincinnati Parks

Zoo Annual Plant Day

Sep 2, 2013
Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden

Coming up this Thursday, a celebration of great plants for landscapes and gardens at the

newsociety.com

  

Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden

 

Director Thane Maynard talks with Lauren Mandel about "Eat Up," her new book on rooftop gardening.

The Organic Gardner

Ohio Valley Greenmarket

Jul 29, 2013

Holly Yurchison/WVXU

Days of dry, intense heat alternating with long periods of almost constant rain, the weather has been hard on farms and gardens this year. But

Monday was Earth Day, and one way to help preserve the landscape and soil is to maintain, and in some cases, resurrect, the native plants that once existed in all regions of the planet. A new book, Back to Eden: Landscaping with Native Plants provides information and instruction on starting a native plant garden, how to make a rain garden, dealing with pests and how to avoid using fertilizers. The author, Dr. Frank Porter, joins Mark Perzel on the phone to discuss the many benefits of using native plants.

Two outstanding organic gardeners have written a two-in-one book just in time for spring planting and menu planning. The Four Season Farm Gardener's Cookbook has recipes for all seasons, plus a garden guide to help you plant what’s perfect for your personal garden. Barbara Damrosch and Eliot Coleman are the authors, and they talk about all the benefits of organic gardening with Mark Perzel.

Another mild winter followed by a colder than usual spring so far has many gardeners in Greater Cincinnati wondering when and how they should start preparing their lawns and flowerbeds to get ready for summer.

Join us Thursday morning April 11 at 9:20 as wediscuss tips and advice to make the most of your spring gardening. Impact Cincinnati, on 91.7, WVXU.Impact Cincinnati, on 91.7, WVXU.  If you have questions for our panel, you can email them toimpact@wvxu.org.

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