fruits and vegetables

Wikipedia, available for use (fast food)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines food deserts as areas – often impoverished – devoid of healthy foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables.

Pixabay, available for use (fruits and vegs)

While some neighborhoods in Cincinnati may be lacking in access to healthy foods, there are various community-based efforts being made to overcome what have been called food deserts. The stores that do provide fresh fruits and vegetables, among other options, set an example and bring change to communities in need.

This year'’s weather has been tough on farmers, but the dozens of  farmer's’ markets around Greater Cincinnati are stocked-full of fresh fruits, vegetables and other locally-produced items, from baked goods and meats to fresh-cut flowers.

Food access and security continues to be a problem, here and in many other parts of the country. According to a 2011 Cincinnati study,  69% of residents live at least 1.5 miles or more from a mainstream grocery outlet. And most of those residents are below the federal poverty line. The Produce Perks program increases affordability and accessibility to healthful foods for low-income families and individuals, focusing on access to healthy fruits and vegetables.

  Maintaining a garden or landscape takes a lot of time and effort, mulching, weeding and watering, to keep everything healthy and looking good. You’re doing all of that work, why not get a bit more out of it by substituting blueberries, vegetables, herbs, or other edible plants for some of the flowers you typically grow, or maybe add a fruit tree to your yard? Joining us to discuss edible gardening and to answer your questions are apple orchardist Marsha Lindner; Melinda O'Briant Adult Education director at Turner Farm; and, David Koester, Campbell County Horticulture extension agent.

The importance of saving heirloom seeds

Jul 19, 2013

Berea, Kentucky author Bill Best has written a new book extolling the need to save and protect the native heirloom seeds for fruits and vegetables. Robyn Carey-Allgeyer talks with the author about Saving Seeds, Preserving Taste: Heirloom Seed Savers in Appalachia and what simple steps every farmer and gardener can do to maintain the genetic diversity these seeds provide.