Freedom Center

Provided / National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

A rare, handwritten copy of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is coming to Cincinnati. The copy is known as the Schuyler Colfax copy, and is one of 14 signed by President Lincoln in addition to the original.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center says document will go on display in January.

A panel discussion examining how the media covered the shooting death of Sam DuBose will take place tomorrow evening at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. “Words & Images: A Media Debrief and Community Conversation” will include attorneys involved in the case, city leaders and members of the local media.

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.

  This week the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is hosting the “Historians Against Slavery” conference, which is designed to facilitate dialogue, scholarship and action in an effort to end modern-day slavery. Joining us to discuss the continuing problem of slavery, in the United States and throughout the world, are Dr.


The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission and the Cincinnati-Hamilton County Community Action Agency are co-sponsoring the “Bridges to Cross: Building Bridges” commemorative march across the Roebling Bridge on August 8 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.


Between 1940 and 1945, approximately 1.3 million men, women and children, most of whom were Jewish, were deported to Auschwitz. Before the concentration camp was finally liberated by Soviet forces on January 27, 1945, 1.1 million had perished there. The Soviet troops found only 7,000 survivors. A new exhibition commemorating the 70th anniversary of the camp’'s liberation, Unlocking the Gates of Auschwitz 70 Years Later, opens January 30 at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

The exhibit uses artifacts, photographs and personal stories, including those of local survivors Bella Ouziel and Werner Coppel, to tell the history of the Holocaust from various perspectives: victim, collaborator, bystander and perpetrator. Joining us this afternoon to share some of that history, are: Werner Coppel; Sarah Weiss, executive director of the Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education; and, Dr. C. G. Newsome,  president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. 

Unlocking the Gates of Auschwitz 70 Years Later is presented by the Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center and Cincinnati Museum Center with the support of the Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati and the Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation.

Provided, Freedom Center, by Farshid Assass, Assassi Productions

 A delegation from the Freedom Center met recently with activists in Greece, Lithuania and Romania, to talk about human trafficking.

Brooke Hathaway of the Freedom Center, who was among the three-member delegation, says they went to Eastern Europe to meet and thank the people who've been instrumental in combating human trafficking in those nations.  She says they wanted to learn from those people and to raise awareness of the problem back in the United States.

This Sunday marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. On November 9, 1989, thousands of Berliners from both East and West climbed over the wall, others went through the border crossing, still others began to physically chip away at the wall that had divided East and West since 1961. Joining us to discuss the historic event, and its impact on world politics, is former U.S. Ambassador to NATO William Howard Taft, IV, and Richard E. Schade, professor emeritus of German Studies at the University of Cincinnati.

William Howard Taft, IV and Herbert Quelle, consul general, Federal Republic of Germany, will be at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this Sunday, November 9, for a program commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Center has been home to a section of the Berlin Wall since 2010, in view of the Ohio River. Click here for information on the free event, or to RSVP call 513-333-7739.