Freedom Center

WVXU/Jim Nolan

Founded in 2003, the nonprofit organization StoryCorps has given more than 100,000 Americans the chance to record interviews about their lives, pass wisdom from one generation to the next, and leave a legacy for the future. It is the largest single collection of human voices ever gathered.

Provided

This Friday, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center will present the world premier of the exhibition, Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu. The exhibition commemorates the life and legacy of former South African President Nelson Mandela through the photographs of Matthew Willman

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center opens its next major exhibition in conjunction with South African documentary photographer Matthew Willman

Wikimedia Commons

World War I began in Europe on July 28, 1914, but the United States did not enter the war until April 6, 1917. More than 17 million military personnel and civilians died, and another 20 million were wounded, in what was once known as "the war to end all wars." American deaths totaled more than 116,000.

Faith and Fashion: The Crowns of African American Women is a pop-up exhibit of church hats worn by African American women, now on display at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

Provided

Dr. Clarence Newsome will step down from his position as president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center at the end of March. 

en.wikipedia.org, available for use

 

Sixty years after the Brown v. Board of Education desegregation ruling, many schools are still racially divided. According to 2012-13 state data, in almost half of schools in Ohio and Kentucky, 90 percent or more students are the same race, usually white. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

More than a thousand local school kids gathered outside the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center Friday afternoon to participate in a nationwide singing of the Star-Spangled Banner.

et_wikipedia.org

In August 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American boy, was kidnapped and murdered by two white men in Money, Mississippi for reportedly flirting with a white woman. An all-white, male jury acquitted the men, who later admitted their guilt.

Provided, image by Lisa Kristine

Humanitarian photographer Lisa Kristine, who specializes in indigenous peoples worldwide, uses her powerful images and intimate portrayals to elevate awareness of social causes such as modern slavery. The United Nations estimates there are approximately 27 to 30 million individuals caught in the slave trade industry today.

Provided

Islamophobia is fear, hatred and hostility toward Islam and Muslims spread by negative stereotypes, often in the media and recently from politicians. It results in discrimination and marginalization of Muslims. From Fear to Freedom: Confronting Islamophobia, taking place at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this Wednesday, is a community conversation that will explore ways to create a more inclusive community free of this prejudice.

adlawcolorado.com

Last November, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center hosted the program Manhood to Brotherhood: An intergenerational discussion on the ideals of manhood and brotherhood from an authentic African American male perspective.

Jane Durrell talks with Dr. Clarence G. Newsome, president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, about their current exhibition featuring the 13th Amendment and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Harvard University Press

One of the cruel abuses of slavery in America was that slaves were forbidden to read and write. But as Trinity College Associate Professor of English and American Studies Christopher Hager reveals in his latest book, “Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing,” some enslaved African Americans did learn to read and write, and during the early years of emancipation thousands more became literate.

Provided / National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

A rare, handwritten copy of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is coming to Cincinnati. The copy is known as the Schuyler Colfax copy, and is one of 14 signed by President Lincoln in addition to the original.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center says document will go on display in January.

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