Freedom Center, available for use


Sixty years after the Brown v. Board of Education desegregation ruling, many schools are still racially divided. According to 2012-13 state data, in almost half of schools in Ohio and Kentucky, 90 percent or more students are the same race, usually white. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

More than a thousand local school kids gathered outside the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center Friday afternoon to participate in a nationwide singing of the Star-Spangled Banner.

In August 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American boy, was kidnapped and murdered by two white men in Money, Mississippi for reportedly flirting with a white woman. An all-white, male jury acquitted the men, who later admitted their guilt.

Provided, image by Lisa Kristine

Humanitarian photographer Lisa Kristine, who specializes in indigenous peoples worldwide, uses her powerful images and intimate portrayals to elevate awareness of social causes such as modern slavery. The United Nations estimates there are approximately 27 to 30 million individuals caught in the slave trade industry today.


Islamophobia is fear, hatred and hostility toward Islam and Muslims spread by negative stereotypes, often in the media and recently from politicians. It results in discrimination and marginalization of Muslims. From Fear to Freedom: Confronting Islamophobia, taking place at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this Wednesday, is a community conversation that will explore ways to create a more inclusive community free of this prejudice.

Last November, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center hosted the program Manhood to Brotherhood: An intergenerational discussion on the ideals of manhood and brotherhood from an authentic African American male perspective.

Jane Durrell talks with Dr. Clarence G. Newsome, president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, about their current exhibition featuring the 13th Amendment and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Harvard University Press

One of the cruel abuses of slavery in America was that slaves were forbidden to read and write. But as Trinity College Associate Professor of English and American Studies Christopher Hager reveals in his latest book, “Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing,” some enslaved African Americans did learn to read and write, and during the early years of emancipation thousands more became literate.

Provided / National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

A rare, handwritten copy of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is coming to Cincinnati. The copy is known as the Schuyler Colfax copy, and is one of 14 signed by President Lincoln in addition to the original.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center says document will go on display in January.

A panel discussion examining how the media covered the shooting death of Sam DuBose will take place tomorrow evening at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. “Words & Images: A Media Debrief and Community Conversation” will include attorneys involved in the case, city leaders and members of the local media.

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.

  This week the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is hosting the “Historians Against Slavery” conference, which is designed to facilitate dialogue, scholarship and action in an effort to end modern-day slavery. Joining us to discuss the continuing problem of slavery, in the United States and throughout the world, are Dr.


The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission and the Cincinnati-Hamilton County Community Action Agency are co-sponsoring the “Bridges to Cross: Building Bridges” commemorative march across the Roebling Bridge on August 8 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.