Freedom Center

For Black History Month: Frank Johnson has a preview of many of the events and activities that will be taking place at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in this conversation with Chris Miller, Manager of Program Initiatives. 

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center has just opened a new exhibition of privately owned African American art. 

WVXU/Jim Nolan

Founded in 2003, the nonprofit organization StoryCorps has given more than 100,000 Americans the chance to record interviews about their lives, pass wisdom from one generation to the next, and leave a legacy for the future. It is the largest single collection of human voices ever gathered.

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This Friday, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center will present the world premier of the exhibition, Mandela: The Journey to Ubuntu. The exhibition commemorates the life and legacy of former South African President Nelson Mandela through the photographs of Matthew Willman

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center opens its next major exhibition in conjunction with South African documentary photographer Matthew Willman

Wikimedia Commons

World War I began in Europe on July 28, 1914, but the United States did not enter the war until April 6, 1917. More than 17 million military personnel and civilians died, and another 20 million were wounded, in what was once known as "the war to end all wars." American deaths totaled more than 116,000.

Faith and Fashion: The Crowns of African American Women is a pop-up exhibit of church hats worn by African American women, now on display at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

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Dr. Clarence Newsome will step down from his position as president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center at the end of March. 

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Sixty years after the Brown v. Board of Education desegregation ruling, many schools are still racially divided. According to 2012-13 state data, in almost half of schools in Ohio and Kentucky, 90 percent or more students are the same race, usually white. 

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More than a thousand local school kids gathered outside the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center Friday afternoon to participate in a nationwide singing of the Star-Spangled Banner.

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In August 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American boy, was kidnapped and murdered by two white men in Money, Mississippi for reportedly flirting with a white woman. An all-white, male jury acquitted the men, who later admitted their guilt.

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Humanitarian photographer Lisa Kristine, who specializes in indigenous peoples worldwide, uses her powerful images and intimate portrayals to elevate awareness of social causes such as modern slavery. The United Nations estimates there are approximately 27 to 30 million individuals caught in the slave trade industry today.

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Islamophobia is fear, hatred and hostility toward Islam and Muslims spread by negative stereotypes, often in the media and recently from politicians. It results in discrimination and marginalization of Muslims. From Fear to Freedom: Confronting Islamophobia, taking place at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this Wednesday, is a community conversation that will explore ways to create a more inclusive community free of this prejudice.

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Last November, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center hosted the program Manhood to Brotherhood: An intergenerational discussion on the ideals of manhood and brotherhood from an authentic African American male perspective.

Jane Durrell talks with Dr. Clarence G. Newsome, president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, about their current exhibition featuring the 13th Amendment and the Emancipation Proclamation.

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One of the cruel abuses of slavery in America was that slaves were forbidden to read and write. But as Trinity College Associate Professor of English and American Studies Christopher Hager reveals in his latest book, “Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing,” some enslaved African Americans did learn to read and write, and during the early years of emancipation thousands more became literate.

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A rare, handwritten copy of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is coming to Cincinnati. The copy is known as the Schuyler Colfax copy, and is one of 14 signed by President Lincoln in addition to the original.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center says document will go on display in January.

A panel discussion examining how the media covered the shooting death of Sam DuBose will take place tomorrow evening at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. “Words & Images: A Media Debrief and Community Conversation” will include attorneys involved in the case, city leaders and members of the local media.

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.

  This week the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is hosting the “Historians Against Slavery” conference, which is designed to facilitate dialogue, scholarship and action in an effort to end modern-day slavery. Joining us to discuss the continuing problem of slavery, in the United States and throughout the world, are Dr.

    

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission and the Cincinnati-Hamilton County Community Action Agency are co-sponsoring the “Bridges to Cross: Building Bridges” commemorative march across the Roebling Bridge on August 8 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.

  

Between 1940 and 1945, approximately 1.3 million men, women and children, most of whom were Jewish, were deported to Auschwitz. Before the concentration camp was finally liberated by Soviet forces on January 27, 1945, 1.1 million had perished there. The Soviet troops found only 7,000 survivors. A new exhibition commemorating the 70th anniversary of the camp’'s liberation, Unlocking the Gates of Auschwitz 70 Years Later, opens January 30 at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

The exhibit uses artifacts, photographs and personal stories, including those of local survivors Bella Ouziel and Werner Coppel, to tell the history of the Holocaust from various perspectives: victim, collaborator, bystander and perpetrator. Joining us this afternoon to share some of that history, are: Werner Coppel; Sarah Weiss, executive director of the Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education; and, Dr. C. G. Newsome,  president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. 

Unlocking the Gates of Auschwitz 70 Years Later is presented by the Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center and Cincinnati Museum Center with the support of the Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati and the Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation.

Provided, Freedom Center, by Farshid Assass, Assassi Productions

 A delegation from the Freedom Center met recently with activists in Greece, Lithuania and Romania, to talk about human trafficking.

Brooke Hathaway of the Freedom Center, who was among the three-member delegation, says they went to Eastern Europe to meet and thank the people who've been instrumental in combating human trafficking in those nations.  She says they wanted to learn from those people and to raise awareness of the problem back in the United States.

This Sunday marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. On November 9, 1989, thousands of Berliners from both East and West climbed over the wall, others went through the border crossing, still others began to physically chip away at the wall that had divided East and West since 1961. Joining us to discuss the historic event, and its impact on world politics, is former U.S. Ambassador to NATO William Howard Taft, IV, and Richard E. Schade, professor emeritus of German Studies at the University of Cincinnati.

William Howard Taft, IV and Herbert Quelle, consul general, Federal Republic of Germany, will be at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this Sunday, November 9, for a program commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Center has been home to a section of the Berlin Wall since 2010, in view of the Ohio River. Click here for information on the free event, or to RSVP call 513-333-7739.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

This weekend the Freedom Center will honor two revolutionary freedom fighters, the late Nelson Mandela and Lech Walesa.

The former Polish President was leader of the non-violent Solidarity movement that ended the Communist regime in Poland in the late 1980s. Friday at a news conference he was asked whether the U.S. is doing enough to bring peace to the Ukraine.

Through an interpreter he said, it appears the U.S. is not willing to continue with it's leadership position, so it should establish the framework for a committee to help solve problems in that region of the world.

Provided, Freedom Center, by Farshid Assass, Assassi Productions

  The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is marking its tenth anniversary this month, it opened August 3, 2004. To commemorate its first decade, the Freedom Center is holding a series of special exhibitions and events this week, including the International Freedom Conductor Award Gala, where Nelson Mandela and Poland’'s former president Lech Walesa will be honored. The late Mr.

Jane Durrell welcomes in studio Assia Johnson from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center to share details of the many events and activities happening in celebration of the center’s 10th anniversary.

Know Theatre is joining with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center to revive the haunting, emotional We Will Rise: Selections from The Afghan Women’s Writing Project in honor of National Women’s Month. Eric Vosmeier, the Know’s artistic director, and Rachel Griner, a P&G loaned executive working with the Freedom Center, talk with Jim Stump about this staged reading production and how the Know commissioned the creation of this script.

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