Focus on Technology

Greater Cincinnati got its first taste of "extreme Christmas decorators" in 2004 when Carson Williams synced his 16,000 lights to music in Mason.

Consumer Electronics Association

Want to wrap your Christmas gift and New Year's resolution into one? Try a device that keeps track of your every waking (and sleeping) moment. The Fitbit Force and its competing brands, count your steps, distance, calories burned, stairs climbed, and active minutes. It also monitors how long and how well you sleep and syncs it with your computer and smartphone.

Emily Wendler / WVXU

You might have heard about the polar bear poop sniffing dog Elvis who tries to determine which polar bears are pregnant, as reported by WVXU in this story. Here he is in suburban Kansas City taking a whiff of each sample and sitting when there is an indication of a pregnancy.

Technology is leveling the playing field for the blind. A British researcher, Stephen Hicks of the University of Oxford, has invented a pair of glasses that act like a movie screen.

This BBC video shows how the glasses will work.

Consumer Electronics Association

Buy a computer, smart phone or tablet on Monday, and a newer model comes out on Friday. Or so it seems in the fast-moving world of technology. What to buy and when to buy it, what’s the best device for your needs, and what new high-tech toy is worth your hard-earned dollars? Find out, as the Consumer Electronics Association’s “Digital Answer Man,” Jim Barry, joins us to share the latest in high-tech products and trends.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

The City of Mason is quickly becoming a magnet for high-tech companies.   Faced with challenging economic times and competition from neighboring cities, Mason decided to get creative to target these sectors:

  • Biohealth
  • Biohealth IT
  • Digital IT

U.S. Government

The Pentagon is increasing its cybersecurity force fivefold after a series of hacking incidents that  have originated in China and other places. In recent months U.S. businesses and newspapers have also been compromised.  Suspects include organized rings and teenage hackers from Russia, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Increasingly the U.S. government and businesses are taking steps to better protect themselves. Ann Thompson reports in Focus on Technology.


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