Focus on Technology

Kasi Infrared / Provided

Potholes can be punishing on your car and wallet. A new AAA survey estimates they cost drivers $6.4 billion per year. They also cost the transportation departments that have to repair the roads.

Cincinnati is in the process of filling 10,000 potholes in three weeks.

But what if work crews could repair potholes permanently? They can, according to Roger Filion, president of Kasi Infrared.

University of Cincinnati

Seeing is believing for University of Cincinnati psychology graduate students who are using eye-tracking devices to study behavior.

MN8 FoxFire

Zachary Green, CEO of MN8 FoxFire, and a Wyoming volunteer firefighter, has found new uses for "glow-in-the-dark" technology and is marketing them nationally and internationally.

He uses photoluminescence technology to light up firefighter helmets, safety signs and floor markings that show a safe way out of a workspace when the electricity goes out.


On May 9, 2014 Oregon firefighter Scott Brawner was exercising at a health club when he got an alert on his smartphone. The notification was from PulsePoint, an app originally designed and built by Northern Kentucky University.  It was the idea of former California fire chief Richard Price.

The 9-1-1 connected mobile app is designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)  emergencies in their proximity.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Last month's Consumer Electronic Show reminded us just how advanced household appliances can be. Refrigerators and washing machines talk to you via text message. The LG Home Chat Fridge lets you know what it still has and what you need. A smart washing machine can start remotely and let you know when your laundry is done.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

During a kindergarten math class at Roselawn Condon School,  teachers throw around terms like schematic, fulcrum, balanced and unbalanced.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A Cincinnati business-led initiative is quietly giving life to an increasing number of technology start-up companies, improving their chances of becoming financially successful.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

It’s a busy day in Montgomery County Domestic Relations Court. Dozens of people are waiting for their divorce hearings. Receptionist Sheila Jarvis keeps it running.

Not only does she answer the phone, she answers questions from people filling the hallways while they wait for their hearings. But she no longer has to check people in because this court now has kiosk check-in. Montgomery County is the first to use court kiosks in Ohio.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Kentucky is leading the nation in its use of big data to help determine bail and criminal sentences.

The data-driven programs Kentucky and at least 20 other states use, like PSA-Court, look at a variety of factors including charges and criminal history. That information is given to a judge to help determine whether the defendant gets out on bail and how long their sentence will be.


Have you ever  thought "I wish I had recorded that?" Kapture, a Cincinnati start-up company, has apparently solved that problem with an audio recording wristband.

Users, without breaking eye-contact, simply double tap to record the previous sixty seconds and with Bluetooth it goes to your smartphone and saves in a Kapture app where you can edit and post to Facebook, Twitter, email or text later.