flooding

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

While receding flood waters are leaving behind plenty of mud and debris, causing big clean-ups along the Ohio, work on Cincinnati's Smale Riverfront Park isn't being affected.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Seasonal flooding comes as no surprise to Tristate officials, who have ordered a handful of road closures, and are preparing to close more as the Ohio River rises.  And the flooding has shined a spotlight on the relative isolation of a pair of Hamilton County communities.

River levels around Hamilton County are already high, and with more rain today and tomorrow, the sheriff's office and county engineer are preparing to close more roads.  Parts of Four Mile, Eight Mile, Debolt and Kellogg had water standing on them earlier this week.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

**Updated March 9**

The Ohio River crested at 53 feet, Sunday, according to the Associated Press.  That's one foot above flood stage.  The river level is expected to fall slowly through the rest of the week.  The National Weather Service is predicting rain on Tuesday, and again Thursday and Friday.

**Original story** 

With plenty of rain and snow this week, area rivers are expected to rise quickly.

Mark Heyne / WVXU News

The rains came but the snow, it seems, may not be as bad as originally thought. 

Late Tuesday forecasters warned a winter storm could dump heavy rains on the area before mixing with and turning to heavy snow by Wednesday night. 

Seth Binau with the National Weather Service in Wilmington says moist air is streaming up from Texas but there’s a definite border between it and drier air to the north.

Storm Water Management Utility City of Cincinnati

City of Cincinnati workers spent Tuesday clearing storm water pipes and manholes of leaves, debris and trash. With lots of melting snow, rain and more snow in the forecast, they're worried about flooding.

Principle engineer of the Storm Water Management Utility, Eric Saylor, put it in perspective. "If we did nothing, basically you'd have overland street flooding. With colder temperatures you would have "ponding" around some of the inlets which could, of course, lead to icing, so it becomes a safety hazard as well."

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