ECOT

A progressive think tank says data from the Ohio Department of Education’s website shows not only how much state money went to the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, but also how much traditional public school districts lost to what was the state’s largest online charter school.

An audit regarding alleged attendance inflation by the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is now in the hands of several investigative agencies. The review claims that ECOT padded their student data on purpose to get more money from the state. Critics say this information comes after years of ECOT operating unchecked.

Republican candidates on this fall’s ballot are moving to distance themselves from the founder of what was the state’s largest online charter schoo, following a state audit that could result in criminal charges and reports of an FBI investigation for illegal campaign contributions.

The state auditor says the state’s largest online charter school committed fraud by inflating student participation numbers in order to continue collecting millions in taxpayer money. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the auditor is now turning over his findings about the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow for possible criminal investigation.

Though it’s been closed for more than four months, critics are now accusing what was the state’s largest online charter school of deliberately manipulating student data to defraud the state out of millions of dollars. The allegation against the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is coming from a former employee. That allegation is now part of a larger investigation. 

Cincinnati Public Schools are preparing to accept students from a failed electronic charter school. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT) closed after the state of Ohio questioned its enrollment numbers and cut off funding.

Thousands of students are either starting in a new school or still looking for a place to take classes after the closure of the state’s largest online charter school. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is still fighting the state’s claw back of $60 million and blames the state Department of Education for its fate. But one vocal critic says ECOT only has itself to blame.