early voting

Ohio voters will be able to cast ballots at their county boards of election on the final three days before the election, after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted’s appeal of a federal court ruling.

Immediately after the decision was rendered by the U.S. Supreme Court, Husted, the Republican who is Ohio’s chief elections officer, issued a directive to all 88 county boards of elections setting uniform hours for voting in-person at the boards on the Saturday, Sunday and Monday before the Tuesday, Nov. 6 election.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted asked county boards of elections to tell him what they want to do about in-person voting the final three days before the election, while Husted waits for a decision on whether the U.S. Supreme Court would hear his appeal of his ban on voting during that period.

In southwest Ohio, the answers Husted is getting are all over the map – with Democratic board members wanting more hours and Republicans generally wanting less.

As of Saturday, Hamilton County's mail-in absentee ballots are running 30 percent above what they were in the last presidential election in 2008, according to figures from the board of elections.

It is an indication of the high interest in this year's presidential contest - and the fact that, this year, six million Ohio voters were mailed absentee ballot applications by Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted.

Cincinnati court reinstates early voting for 3 days before election

Oct 5, 2012

A major court ruling Friday declares that Ohio may not ban early in-person voting on the three days just before election day itself.

Early voting begins Tuesday in Ohio; and election officials expect the number of voters who vote early by mail and in-person at boards of election to surpass that of the last presidential election four years ago.

As of Friday, the Hamilton County Board of Elections had already nearly 62 thousand and 5 hundred absentee ballot applications.

Four years ago, nearly 62 thousand Hamilton County voters cast ballots by mail or in-person at the board of elections. That was slightly more than one of every four ballots case.

There are signs that the early voting which begins in Ohio Tuesday is going to be even bigger this year than it was in the last presidential election four years ago.

Registered voters in Ohio will be able to vote in person at their county boards of elections beginning Tuesday morning, but many more are expected to vote absentee by mail.

As of Thursday, the Hamilton County Board of Elections had already received absentee ballot applications from 61,263 voters.

“They’ve been pouring in,’’ said Amy Searcy, director of the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

There’s no word yet on what will happen to the two Democratic members of the Montgomery County Board of Elections who faced a hearing at the Ohio Secretary of State’s office this morning. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles has the latest in the fight to get in person, early voting on the weekends.

Drumming sound of protestors


In politics, as in most human endeavors, a compromise solution that leaves both sides less than ecstatically happy is probably the right solution.

That may be the case with Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted’s decision this week to set uniform hours for early, in-person voting at all of Ohio’s 88 county board of elections.

Hundreds of Hamilton County Democrats want a federal court to intervene forcing the Board of Elections to have Saturday hours for the month leading up to the presidential election.

The overflow crowd at a Hamilton County Board of Elections meeting extended out into the hallway as Democrats clamored for something to be done. They say Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted's directive didn't go far enough without Saturday hours for early voting.

Board Democrat Caleb Faux got right to the point.