drugs

Provided / Hamilton County

Hamilton County is preparing to create a Heroin Task Force aimed at curbing the rapidly increasing number of users and overdoses.

Commission President Greg Hartmann announced the effort during his annual State of the County address Thursday.

"Nine thousand heroin addicts came through our jail in 2013," says Hartmann. "There's seven heroin overdoses per day in the City of Cincinnati. I've begun discussions in Columbus. I'm also going to invite the City and our public health experts."

His office later released the following goals for 2015:

Deputies find heroin in Bible

Jan 16, 2015
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Two people are accused of trying to smuggle heroin into the Hamilton County Justice Center in a Bible. 

Chief Deputy Mark Schoonover says the Bible was sent to the jail in mid December, and like all mail, it was searched.

A Sheriff’s K-9 indicated the presence of narcotics on the Bible; and deputies took a closer look.  On page 419 and 420, in the Book of Daniel, they noticed a light brown stain, about the size of a half dollar.

Schoonover says deputies cut a small piece of the page out and had it tested.  The results of the test were positive for heroin. 

This summer a Delhi woman died of a heroin overdose, the same day she allegedly bought the drugs from Christopher and Stephanie Eaglin.

In addition to trafficking and possession charges, the Eaglins are now facing an involuntary manslaughter indictment in connection with the death of that Delhi woman, 21-year-old Shea Fricke.

The Prosecutor's Office says this is the first case in Hamilton County where a drug dealer has been charged with involuntary manslaughter in an overdose death.

A survey of Tristate students  finds the majority are not using or abusing drugs and other substances.

The 2014 Student Drug-Use Survey finds:

  • 95.7% do not use prescription drugs non-medically
  • 90.2% do not smoke cigarettes
  • 88.6% do not use marijuana
  • 82.2% do not use alcohol

The study is conducted every two years by the Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati (CDFGC). More than 56,000 7th-12th grade students from 107 schools took the survey this past fall.

  The United States has been waging the War on Drugs for more than 40 years, spending an estimated $1 trillion  during  that time. Many wonder if it’s time to re-think how we fight drug abuse and the criminal enterprise that surrounds and fosters it, through a system of substance regulation and control.

  The local heroin crisis has rightfully received a lot of attention, but alcohol is still the most-abused drug in the U.S. It wrecks lives, devastates families, and is responsible for more than 4,300 deaths each year among those under the age of 21.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Ohio Governor John Kasich came to Finneytown Secondary School Wednesday to launch "Start Talking,'' a statewide effort to cut down the use of heroin and prescription drugs among young people.
 
Kasich, with Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and members of his cabinet at his side, said Start Talking will involve parents, teachers coaches and the students themselves in helping end the drug abuse he said is in every town, in every corner of the state.

It is a problem, Kasich said, which won't go away on its own and has to be met head-on by every family in Ohio.

Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

Jul 16, 2013

If you've been wondering what to do with old or expired medications, you're in luck. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is hosting a take-back day Saturday.

You can drop off unused prescription and over-the-counter drugs at various sites around the state.

Organizers say meds should be in their original containers but be sure to remove any identifying information such as prescription labels. Syringes, liquids and intravenous products are not allowed.

Collected medications will be disposed of following EPA guidelines.

Howard Rahtz has a fascinating background: 18 years as a Cincinnati police officer, attaining the rank of captain. He also served as coordinator of the SWAT negotiating team and was in charge of the Central Vice Control Section, where his focus was on reducing the assets of drug traffickers. He has put all that experience, plus a degree in rehab counseling, to try and further efforts to take drugs off the streets. He joins Ann Thompson to discuss his latest book, Drugs, Crime and Violence: From Trafficking to Treatment, in which he lays out a method to choke off the revenue stream that supports the drug traffickers.