dogs

Dayton Police / Provided

Some special Dayton police officers will be better equipped soon.

Five Dayton police dogs are getting new ballistic vests.

Members of Dayton Women of the Moose, Chapter 9 were inspired by a program called Protect the Protectors, but decided to put their own spin on things.

  

After months of debate, Cincinnati Council gave final approval Wednesday to a compromise ordinance targeting people who let their dangerous or vicious dogs run loose in the city.  The proposal includes tougher fines for owners, but it does not have any criminal sanctions such as jail time.

Council has been debating the city's dog laws after a six-year-old girl was severely injured in a dog attack last summer.

 Council Member Kevin Flynn said the goal is to correct the bad behavior of the owner.

UPDATE:  Council may now in fact vote on the dog ordinance Wednesday.  Mayor's spokesperson said if the city's Law Department can make some last minute changes in time, will happen today.

Original post: The full Cincinnati Council will likely not vote on an ordinance Wednesday to crackdown on people who do not control their dangerous or vicious dogs.  The Law and Public Safety Committee approved a compromise proposal Monday.  

Cincinnati Council could vote Wednesday on an ordinance to crack down on people who do not control their vicious or dangerous dogs.

A compromise proposal will include higher fines for people who break the law and setup an animal task force to study the issues.  Earlier plans included criminal sanctions, including jail time, but those were removed.

The Law and Public Safety Committee also rejected a plan to require pitbull owners to register their dogs and have them wear special identification collars.

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