depression

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An increasing number of medical researchers, educators and tech professionals are issuing warnings about the amount of time children and teens spend on smartphones, tablets and computers.

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If the last political story you heard on NPR got your blood boiling, the last article you read online made you feel hopeless and the last time you scrolled Facebook to cheer you up you saw a video that made you cry, it may be time to curb your media consumption.

Cincinnati Children's

More than 40 million American adults up to age 69 have trouble hearing according to the National Institutes of Health NIH. Yet fewer than 30 percent have used a hearing device by age 70. Studies now show hearing loss as a risk factor for developing dementia, and it is found to contribute to feelings of isolation and depression.

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Genetic testing is being used more frequently to help physicians prescribe medications that will prove most effective based on an individual patient's genetic makeup. 

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About six million Americans age 65 and older experience symptoms of depression. Though common among the elderly, depression is not a normal part of aging. 

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Academic and social pressures can make  junior high and high school a tough time for teenagers. And during those formative years, teens are also going through physical, mental and emotional changes. According to the National Alliance on Mental Health, one in five adolescents ages 13-18 have or will develop a serious mental illness such as depression.

Maternal depression affects up to 45% of all pregnant, postpartum and parenting women in home visiting programs. Cincinnati’s Every Child Succeeds Scientific Director Dr. Robert Ammerman has developed and deployed the Moving Beyond Depression™ (MBD) maternal depression treatment program, to help reverse the downward spiral that results from clinical maternal depression. 

American Pscyhological Association

It’s easy for a parent to tell when a child has a fever or stomach ache, but a mental health problem may be much harder to detect. Millions of children in the United States suffer from depression, anxiety, ADHD or a host of other mental health issues, but many go undiagnosed or properly treated. We discuss recognizing and treating mental health issues in children with Lindner Center of HOPE, Staff Psychiatrist Dr. Leah Casuto, Clinical Director of Psychiatry at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Dr. Michael Sorter, and Director of Mental Health for The Children's Home of Cincinnati, Debbie Gingrich.

Researchers from several universities, including UC, say a new study shows men are at a greater risk of depression than women following a stroke.

Assistant professor of social work Michael McCarthy theorizes there's a connection between depression and mens' beliefs about their familial roles.