crime

Howard Wilkinson

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley promised a lot of action in his first State of the City address Thursday night - less gun violence, a greater emphasis on basic services to the neighborhoods and a reduction in the number of Cincinnati residents living in poverty, among other things.

And, Cranley promised, a city that is even more fun to live in than it is now. He went so far as to say he is appointing an unpaid, volunteer “Commissioner of Fun” for the city.

Michael Keating

Despite back-to-back shooting incidents downtown this week, shootings and violent crime remain down in Cincinnati compared to last year.

Chief Jeffrey Blackwell says police are stepping up patrols throughout the summer anyway to make sure people feel, and are, safe downtown.

"We're going to have a comprehensive incident command-based plan as we move forward to address every weekend event that we have from now through Labor Day and beyond even through Oktoberfest," says Blackwell.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The numbers point to a safer Cincinnati, but the perception for many is that some neighborhoods still aren't. Just today District Three Police Captain Dan Gerard took members of the Board of Realtors on a tour of Price Hill, where crime is at its lowest in ten years.

 

Off the Streets

May 8, 2014

  

Provided, Survive Institute

  What would you do if attacked in a dark parking garage or assaulted on a deserted city street? Most of us would probably freeze. But for more than 30 years, Mike and Debbie Gardner of the Survive Institute have been training people how to be aware of their surroundings, to avoid confrontations when possible, and to defend themselves when necessary. Defense experts and “Courage Coaches” Mike and Debbie Gardner join us to talk about what they term, “Self-defense with love.”

Provided / City of Cincinnati


Provided, WCPO

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati say increasing the minimum wage won't lower crime rates.

When debating the idea of raising the minimum wage, proponents sometimes suggest doing so will cause a decrease in crime. But the team at UC says that's just not the case.

The researchers compared violent and property crime rates in the US from 1977 to 2012 to states that follow the federal minimum wage rate and states with a higher rate.

Provided

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil says deputies who used a Taser early Tuesday morning to subdue a man resisting arrest appear to have followed department protocols.

59-year-old Gary Roell stopped breathing after the incident and was pronounced dead at Bethesda North Hospital.

"These are instances where you are justified in deploying a Taser: in protection of others, including yourself; and to meet the resistance of someone who is not complying, who is resisting arrest, to gain control of the situation," says Neil.

The police are looking for you. Not to worry though, they just want to hang out and have a good time.

Tuesday is National Night Out, an event aimed at raising crime prevention awareness and developing partnerships between neighborhoods and police officers. There are 8 mini block parties scheduled for around Cincinnati with free food and drinks.

Police and fire equipment will also be on hand for kids to see up close.

Nationwide, more than 37 million people are expected to participate.

Locations:

Hamilton County's prosecutor says he will not file any charges in the death of 46-year-old Patrick Mahaney. He's the man several teenagers attacked last year in the so-called 'boredom beating' death in North College Hill.

The announcement follows the County Coroner's ruling that Mahaney died of natural causes and not residual effects of the August 2012 beating.

Five boys pleaded guilty to felonious assault. A sixth is contesting the charges against him. At the time they reportedly said they decided to beat up Mahaney because they had nothing better to do.

  Internet attacks on nations, banks, universities and individuals have increased dramatically over the last few years. Dr. Richard J Harknett, head of the University of Cincinnati Department of Political Science, and UC Associate Professor of Information Technology Mark Stockman discuss cyber security and protecting your online information.

Michael Keating

Cincinnati police say homicides and violent crime were down overall last year compared to 2011.

Chief James Craig wants to see that trend continue this year.

"We've set for 2013 a very modest overall crime reduction goal of five percent. We had a five percent goal at the beginning of 2012 and we certainly exceeded that, ending the year with a ten percent reduction in overall crime," he says.

Over-the-Rhine, Avondale and Winton Hills saw the biggest drops in homicides. Walnut Hills and East Price Hill both saw increases.

University of Cincinnati

The University of Cincinnati is stepping up safety measures following several incidents in and around campus.

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