Clyde Gray

Provided by Clyde Gray

Clyde Gray returns to WCPO-TV to co-host "Cincy Lifestyle" next week, after a detour through WXIX-TV.

Provided by Clyde Gray

After nearly a four-year absence, former news anchor Clyde Gray will return to WCPO-TV on May 7 on a new local weekday lifestyle show.

WLWT-TV

Commercial television in Cincinnati turns 70 on Friday, Feb. 9, when WLWT-TV started commercial operation in 1948 – Cincinnati's first television.

Crosley Broadcasting had been experimenting with television for nearly a year with W8XCT. WLWT-TV was the city's only TV station for 14 months, until Taft Broadcasting's WKRC-TV signed on in April 1949. WCPO-TV followed in July 1949.

WCPO-TV

For more than 30 years, people here have eaten dinner while watching Carol Williams deliver the evening news on WCPO-TV.

Starting Monday, she'll be at home watching the evening news like the rest of us. Williams, who has been working part-time since the start of 2016, retires Friday.

WCPO-TV

Kristyn Hartman, main evening co-anchor at Columbus' WBNS-TV, will replace WCPO-TV news anchor Carol Williams in mid-April.

Williams, whose 30-year tenure began in the Al Schottelkotte era, will retire after February sweeps, says the WCPO-TV announcement.

Provided by WCPO-TV, Scripps Media, Inc.

You might not know Ron Fischer's name, but you've seen his work.

In nearly 51 years at WCPO-TV, he has photographed presidents (dating back to Lyndon Johnson), parades, press conferences, plane crashes, court proceedings, World Series, natural disasters, arrests, murders, meetings and all kinds of events for Channel 9.

Provided by Clyde Gray

WCET-TV kicks off its "Veterans Coming Home" campaign with a forum Tuesday, July 19, at the Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County, 800 Vine St., downtown.

It's part of a national project aimed at closing the military-civilian divide by encouraging conversations across the country, says Kellie May, CET public relations and digital media specialist.

John Kiesewetter

  Three of the most prominent African-American TV anchors – John Lomax, Courtis Fuller and John Lomax – will kick off the downtown Public Library’s “Finding a Voice and Shaping an Identity: African Americans and the Media” series for Black History Month at 2 p.m. Saturday.

Lomax, hired by WKRC-TV (Channel 12) in 1983, has been part of the “Good Morning Cincinnati” newscast since it premiered in 1990.

Fuller, WLWT-TV (Channel 5) weekend anchor, came to Channel 5 in the late 1980s. He took a break from TV to run for Cincinnati mayor after the 2001 riots – losing to former Channel 5 anchor Charlie Luken. He returned to Channel 5 in 2003.

Tribune Broadcasting

Before we welcome 2016, let’s look back at this year in TV, movies, radio and media from A to Z.

John Kiesewetter

After 29 years at WCPO-TV – most of them as main co-anchor – Carol Williams will leave the 11 p.m. anchor desk in January.

Williams, the longest-tenured 11 p.m. female news anchor in town, will work part-time in 2016, and retire in 2017, said Alex Bongiorno, Channel 9 news director, in a note to staffers late Friday.

The departure of Williams, hired in 1986, means that three-fourths of the main anchor team will change in less than three years, following the exits of sports anchor Dennis Janson (2013) and news anchor Clyde Gray (2014).

Provided by Clyde Gray

  A year after leaving TV news, Clyde Gray says life is “wonderful.” He’s getting more hugs and kisses from his daughter and wife, as he had hoped when he voluntarily left WCPO-TV a year ago.

And he laughs when it snows – because he doesn’t have to leave home to go to work.

Gray, 60, a TV newsman here for 33 years, is building his Blackboard Marketing public relations and marketing firm from his Symmes Township home office, and enjoying evenings with his wife and 8-year-old daughter.