City parking

Cincinnati recently changed some parking meter rates in parts of Downtown and Over-the-Rhine.  
 

It is part of a contract with the Xerox Company to help analyze the city's parking assets.  City officials are reviewing that data and using it to price meters.  

Community and Economic Development Director Oscar Bedolla said smartphone technology is coming soon.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati is increasing parking meter rates in parts of Downtown and Over-the-Rhine starting Tuesday.  The city released the information Thursday along with a map highlighting the changes.  

City Manager Harry Black said the new rates reflect "dynamic pricing."

“We can look at usage across the city, and as a result, we can make pricing decisions on demand that allows us to achieve our revenue goals while at the same time meeting the parking needs of the public,” Black said.

Starting Friday, parking meter rates increase in Over-the-Rhine and you'll have to pay to park longer in the evening there and in Downtown.  

Hours of operation will be from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday.  

In addition, the meter rate in OTR will increase to a $1 per hour.  The Downtown price remains $2 per hour.  

In two weeks, new parking hours and meter rates will be coming to Downtown Cincinnati and Over-the-Rhine.  

Starting January 2nd, parking meters will be enforced from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday.  Currently meters are enforced from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Central Business District (CBD) and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in most parts of Over-the-Rhine (OTR), and Sunday parking had been free.  

The offices of dunnhumby USA are still under construction but the parking garage beneath those offices is open.  City leaders cut the ribbon on the 1,000 space garage Monday morning.  Construction on the project at 5th and Race began in January 2013.   

The building includes six floors of parking and three floors of office space, with retail on the ground floor.

The president of PNC Bank, Kay Geiger, calls the project "transformative."

Pages