City of Cincinnati

    

Last month Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black released his proposed city biennial budget for fiscal years 2016 and 2017. Now, after holding public hearings and listening to citizen comments, council members are discussing possible changes to the proposed budget, with the full council scheduled to vote on the final spending plan June 17.

Courtesy WCPO

Mayor John Cranley, City Manager Harry S. Black, and Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell stood alongside community members to unveil the Police Department’s Summer Safety Initiative Plan this morning. City Manager Harry Black is fully supportive of the plan, which includes personnel redeployment, community and youth outreach initiatives, and enhanced C.I.R.V capacity.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Assistant City Manager Scott Stiles is a finalist for the city manager's position in Garden Grove, California, and will leave Cincinnati City Hall on July 17 after 27 years of service.

  A new program is underway in Cincinnati that officials say will make city government faster, more effective and smarter while saving money.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati’s Public Services Department is about to get tough on those residents who put out “improperly prepared” trash for pick-up.

  The Cincinnati charter, adopted by voters in 1926, is the city’'s constitution. It governs every aspect of how Cincinnati is governed and how it operates. The 24-member Cincinnati Charter Review Task Force has been reviewing the charter over the past year.

Last month Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black appointed Thomas B. Corey as the city’'s Economic Inclusion Executive Project Director. Mr. Corey will oversee the city’'s newly-formed Department of Economic Inclusion. Harry Black and Thomas Corey join us to discuss the city'’s redefined efforts to improve the local economy by boosting opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses.

Bill Rinhart/WVXU

City officials say tests on debris from a three-story building on West Court Street that collapsed Saturday night showed no asbestos removal is necessary in the clean-up.

City officials say, the owner may now remove all the debris so ordinary traffic can be resumed on West Court Street. The city has ordered the owner, Historic Limited Liability Company, to finish the clean-up and stabilize the remaining building.

City officials say the work must be supervised by a professional architect or engineer hired by the owner.

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati’s “Holiday Food for Fines” program collected 3,580 canned foods for the Freestore Foodbank and resulted in $12,780 in parking fines collected.

The program gave people with outstanding parking tickets a chance to have the late fees waived in exchange for 10 donated canned goods.

According to City Manager Harry Black, 286 people took advantage of the city’s offer; and, in some cases, people donated more than the required 10 cans of food. The people who participated were required to make a payment of $45 in addition to donating the canned food.

Provided

The city of Cincinnati has a new city solicitor, Paula Boggs Muething, and a new trade and  development director, Oscar Bedolla, city manager Harry Black announced Monday.

Boggs Muething is currently general counsel and vice president of community development revitalization at the Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority. Before that, she served as a senior assistant city solicitor.

Bedolla has worked in the private sector on large development projects.

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