city budget

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati residents can now go online to offer suggestions for neighborhood projects they think should be funded in the next city budget.  

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati council members are expected to get more information this month on the city's debt policy—a debt that has increased by more than $207 million since 2010.  

The group could be asked to approve that document in August.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati administrators will now begin the process of enacting the new budget for the fiscal year, which starts at the end of next week.  

Council voted Wednesday for the dozens of ordinances necessary to enact the spending plan.  In most cases, the council voted unanimously for some parts of the budget.  Council Member Kevin Flynn did vote no on some items and on the funding sources to pay for them.

Cincinnati Council's Budget and Finance Committee will meet again Wednesday morning to try to put the finishing touches on a budget for the new fiscal year which starts July 1st.  

The committee was supposed to do that Monday.  But work stopped concerning a disagreement over what should be included in an omnibus ordinance.  

Cincinnati Council Member Charlie Winburn has introduced the first set of motions making changes to the budget plan submitted by Mayor John Cranley and City Manager Harry Black.

incinnati council members will now have several days to write motions to make their proposed changes to the city’s fiscal year budget, which will take effect July 1.

 

Some on council will use the comments they heard from residents during three public hearings to make those alterations to the proposed spending plan.

 

Cincinnati residents have one last chance Tuesday night to comment on the city's proposed budget for the fiscal year, which is set to begin July 1st.

City Council's Budget and Finance Committee is holding a final public hearing beginning at six o'clock at the College Hill Recreation Center, located at 5545 Belmont Avenue.

An overflow crowd filled a small room at the Oakley Recreation Center Thursday night for the first of three public hearings on Cincinnati's proposed budget for the new fiscal year.  

About 30 people offered comments on the spending plan during the two-hour long hearing.

Some Cincinnati Council members are still asking that audits of the Metropolitan Sewer District and the city's parks department be released before votes on the budget later this month.

It appears Cincinnati Council's decision to increase human services funding by $3 million last year is making a difference.  The funds are distributed to 34 programs focused on preventing homelessness and increasing gainful employment.   

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