Cincinnati

Michael E. Keating

Ohio Gov. John Kasich will take a break from selling his budget plan to the state legislature Monday night when he comes to Cincinnati to be the keynote speaker at the Hamilton County Republican Party's annual Lincoln-Reagan Day dinner.

The dinner and program begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Junior Ballroom of the Duke Energy Convention Center downtown, with the governor making his speech a half hour later.

The Lincoln-Reagan Day dinner is one of the party's major fundraising events of the year. This year, ticket prices begin at $75 for individuals and $750 for a table of 10.

Photos: Cinciditarod 2013

Mar 2, 2013
Sarah Ramsey

For the past three years Cincinnati has held a shopping cart race around downtown to raise money for the local Freestore Foodbank.

This year's Cinciditarod took place around downtown Cincinnati and over the bridge into Newport, KY.

Contestants form teams, put on costumes, and decorate carts to race. There are checkpoints where the contestants are asked to eat, drink, dance, and even pose with Mr. Redlegs.

Teams have two and half hours to complete all the checkpoints before making it back to Fountain Square, the finish line.

Team Hoist won this year.

photo by Michael Keating

J. Kenneth Blackwell and Jerry Springer - political polar opposites who served together on Cincinnati City Council in the 1970s - will share the stage March 12 for Beyond Civility's "Side-by-Side" discussion series.

Springer, a former councilman and mayor who went on to international fame as a TV talk show host, is a liberal Democrats. Blackwell, a former state treasurer and secretary of state who ran unsuccessfully for Ohio governor in 2006, is a conservative Republican.

David Mann - former Cincinnati City Council member, mayor, and congressman - is running again for Cincinnati City Council, 20 years after he left that legislative body.

About three dozen supporters crowded into the lobby of Mann's downtown law office Tuesday morning to hear him officially announce his candidacy.

"I am not running for mayor again; I'm not running for Congress,'' the 73-year-old Democrat said. "I'm running to be  the best city council member I can be."

Mann served on that body from 1974 to 1992, with two stints as the city's mayor - 198-1982 and 1991.

Libertarian Jim Berns has filed petitions to run for Cincinnati mayor, setting up what will be the first mayoral primary election in the city since 2005.

Democrats Roxanne Qualls, a former mayor and now vice mayor, and former council member John Cranley have not filed their petitions yet, but are actively campaigning and raising money and plan to file petitions by the June filing deadline.

Berns' entry into the race guarantees a primary election in the city of Cincinnati on Sept. 10; and it will be a costly one.

Employees of dunnhumbyUSA and community leaders gathered at the corner of Fifth and Race in Cincinnati Thursday morning for the groundbreaking ceremony for the company's four-story headquarters.

The $100 million development  will include a 1,000- space parking garage and 35,000 square feet of commercial space.



 

A recent survey conducted by The Entrepreneurs' Organization indicates 62 percent of Cincinnati-area entrepreneurs think they'll see increased net profits in 2013.  Forty-one percent of those surveyed expect to hire more full-time employees, while 50 percent expect to hire more part-time workers.

The survey included 43 Cincinnati-area companies with at least $1 million in annual revenue.  Overall, the average respondent grosses $3.4 million in revenue.

Photos from Cincinnati's Martin Luther King Day march

Jan 21, 2013
All photos by Michael Keating

City of Cincinnati employees will observe  Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday.  That means garbage and recycling collection will be delayed by one day all week.

Monday's pickup will be Tuesday, Tuesday's pickup will be Wednesday, and so forth.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Carthage and Mt. Airy are the two newest communities targeted for Cincinnati's Neighborhood Enhancement Program (NEP). 

Beginning March 1, police, businesses and civic groups will work together on an accelerated revitalization and reinvestment plan.

Provided

Listening Thursday night to P.G. Sittenfeld, a Democratic Cincinnati city council member, and Mike Wilson, the founder of the Cincinnati Tea Party, sit onstage at  Hebrew Union College might, one would think, produce some partisan sparks.

It did no such thing.
 

Instead, the crowd of about 200 in Mayerson Hall, heard two young men talk about their backgrounds, their early family lives, about the influences that led them toward politics, and about the need to listen – really listen – to what people of opposing ideologies and political persuasions have to say.

Michael Keating

While Democrats in Washington are attending the inaugural balls on January 21, Cincinnati area Democrats will be holding their own celebration of President Obama's inauguration at a downtown bar.

Cincy's on Sixth, at the corner of East Sixth and Walnut streets, will be the scene of a $20-a-head "Partiers for Obama" inauguration party, beginning at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 21 - seven hours after President Obama is sworn in for a second term on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol.

In decades of writing column, I don’t think I have ever started one on a personal note.
 

But with this most interesting year coming to a close, and a new one about to begin, I will, if you will indulge me.


For me, it has been quite a year.


After 29 years, six months and two days at the Cincinnati Enquirer, writing on politics and a myriad of other subjects, I took an early retirement offer from the Enquirer in April, leaving behind working on a daily basis with good friends and  opportunities to do interesting journalism too numerous to count.

The Prince Hall Shriners, who filled downtown Cincinnati in August 2011 with 25,000 members, spouses and family, liked the experience so much they are bringing their national convention back in 2015.


The Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine – better known as the Prince Hall Shriners  - is the oldest African-American fraternal organization in the world , founded in 1893 with 35,000 members in 227 Shrine Temples around the country.

In 2013, the Cincinnati mayor’s race is likely to suck most of the air out of the room, as it has since the city adopted direct election of the mayor in 2001.


But it is not the only important race in Cincinnati next year.


There is this little thing called a city council election; and it will be vastly different this year than any other since the city charter was created in the 1920s.


As of now, Cincinnati voters will be electing nine council members for four-year terms, instead of the two-year terms we have had since 1927.

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