Cincinnati

Jim Nolan / WVXU

Other than the Steelers, there's one team every Bengals fan loves to hate. Cincinnati squares off against the Cleveland Browns Thursday night in a rivalry that's only grown over the years... especially when former coach Sam Wyche famously chastised a Cincinnati crowd saying, "You don't live in Cleveland, you live in Cincinnati!" Earlier this year WVXU's Tana Weingartner teamed up with Kabir Bhatia at WKSU in Kent to figure out the source of all this intrastate animosity.

Here's an encore presentation of their report:

New Beginnings

Oct 15, 2015

On this episode of Local Exposure, we discuss New Beginnings.

Introduction: A re-evaluation of the 'P-Word'

Part 1: Meet Belinda Cai, the newest contributor to Local Exposure

Part 2: Get a preview of the Cincinnati Cyclones 2015-2016 season  from Kristin Ropp, VP and GM for the Cyclones and US Bank Arena.

Part 3: Belinda speaks with Rachelle Caplan, the head organizer of LadyFest Cincinnati and talks about the schedule of events. Belinda also wrote an article about LadyFest for this week's CityBeat.

Department of State

The public event Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton had scheduled for Sept. 10 in Cincinnati has been moved to Columbus, according to a Clinton campaign official.

U.S. Senate

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated Sanders would physically be in Cincinnati. He will, in fact, be live-streaming the event to multiple venues nationwide. 

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders will bring his campaign to Cincinnati Wednesday, July 29, when he live-streams a message to supporters at the Woodward Theater in Over-the-Rhine.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Cincinnati’s Law and Public Safety Committee has approved a new set of rules for the use of city swimming pools by children. Recreation officials say the rules will protect children without hindering their ability to learn to swim at an early age.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, along with his district commanders and assistant chiefs, will hold a series of community meetings Thursday and Friday with community members aimed at stemming a rising tide of gun violence in the city.

Library of Congress

As Cincinnati slept in the early morning hours of April 27, 1865, the SS Sultana, a steamboat that had been built in the shipyards here two years before, was slowly chugging up the Mississippi River near Memphis.

Cincinnati, like every city and village in the Union, was simultaneously relieved that the bloody Civil War was ending and mourning the death of President Abraham Lincoln, assassinated only 13 days before.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials are always talking about ways to share services.  But it appears the city may be ready to "unshare" one service.  

Cincinnati Council is being asked to approve an ordinance dropping the city's membership in the Hamilton County Storm Water District. 

“Goat,” a major motion picture, will be filmed in Cincinnati beginning next month, according to the Greater Cincinnati Film Commission.

The film – adapted from a memoir of fraternity hazing – is being produced by producers Christine Vachon and David Hinojosa of Killer Films, along with Rabbit Bandini Productions’ James Franco and Vince Jolivette, a Hamilton native.

The executive producer is John Wells, who has won Emmy awards for "ER" and "The West Wing;" and is executive producer of the Showtime series "Shameless."

Cincinnati acquires Jazz Hall of Fame

Mar 10, 2015

For those who appreciate music, recognizing the great artists who work so hard to create it is quite important. Musicians devote their lives to composing passion into impacting melodies that serve to move the soul. To recognize the artist for their work is to let them know we appreciate their gift, and thank them for sharing it. There are many award organizations that exist for this reason, such as the Grammys and Hard Rock, but those only begin to touch on the number of musicians who deserve our gratitude. 

Jon Hughes/photopresse

Throughout the Civil War, on the bloody battlefields and in the hospitals overflowing with the wounded, many a mortally wounded young soldier left this life looking into the kindly face of a nun from Cincinnati.

“Lord have mercy on his soul,’’ were the last words he heard, and a promise from the woman dressed in black that she would tell his mother that he died bravely.

She was Sister Anthony O’Connell, known throughout the Union Army as “the Angel of the Battlefield.”

U.S. District Court, Southern District of Ohio

Judge S. Arthur Spiegel, one of the longest serving federal judges in Cincinnati history, has died at the age of 94.

Spiegel, a Marine Corps veteran of World War II, was appointed to the U.S. District Court of Southern Ohio in 1980 by President Jimmy Carter. In 1995, Spiegel took senior status, but continued to hear cases.

Several years ago, Spiegel published a memoir of his life called “A Trial on the Merits.” In it, he wrote of his legal career, but also of his time as a Marine, when he flew a single-engine plane into combat.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The NAACP has chosen Cincinnati as the site of its 2016 national convention, an event that will bring nearly 10,000 people to the city – and is likely to draw the 2016 presidential candidates as well.

The NAACP last held its national convention here in 2008, a presidential election year; and it drew then-Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama and GOP nominee John McCain to the Duke Energy Convention Center. 2016, too, is a presidential election year; and the July event can be expected to draw presidential candidates and other national political figures.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) has awarded Cincinnati a perfect score on its municipal equality index, which ranks a city based on its record of laws and policies protecting sexual and gender identity. HRC vice president Fred Sainz says Cincinnati is on the “forefront of equality”.

Sainz says in the city can't rest on its laurels; and should continually rededicate itself to making life better for all citizens.

On a cold, drizzly fall afternoon in 1958, a trio of duck hunters stumbled on the charred remains of Cincinnati resident Louise Bergen. When investigators learned that her estranged husband was living with an older divorcée, Edythe Klumpp, they wasted no time in questioning her. When she failed a lie detector test, Edythe spilled out a confession. Although it did not fit the physical evidence, she was found guilty and sentenced to death in the electric chair.

Governor Michael V. DiSalle put his political career on the line to save Edythe from the death penalty, personally interviewing the prisoner while she was under the influence of "truth serum." But was it the truth? Richard O Jones separates the facts from the fiction in this comprehensive book about the Klumpp murder in Cincinnati's Savage Seamstress: The Shocking Edythe Klumpp Murder Scandal.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

City of Cincinnati employee Chris Hines bends over and installs a lock on one of nearly six dozen sewer grates that have been stolen this month.

This one is on Southside Ave. in Riverside.  City supervisor Rick St. John says Riverside and Sayler Park are where most have been stolen. A few have gone missing from South Fairmount and one from Camp Washington.

St. John says, "Unfortunately we can't afford to do a wholesale placement of locks, so a lot of times we put tar down... to make it difficult for somebody to pull the grates up."

National Urban League

About 8,500 delegates will arrive in Cincinnati Wednesday for the four-day annual conference of the National Urban League.

The event at the Duke Energy Convention Center will feature some well-known speakers – Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a potential Republican presidential candidate, on Friday.

The theme of this year’s annual conference is “One Nation Underemployed: Bridges to Jobs and Justice.”

 

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

General Electric, a week after it announced it would build its Global Operation Center at The Banks, held a celebration today in their temporary headquarters with Gov. John Kasich and a host of elected officials and community leaders who had a hand in bringing the center to Cincinnati.

Cincinnati City Council and the Hamilton County commissioners approved packages of tax incentives to nail down the deal. Kasich’s private, non-profit development firm, JobsOhio worked for months with GE officials to convince them to bring the operations center here.

Cincinnati Republicans learned this afternoon they would not be chosen as a finalist for the 2016 Republican National Convention, so they formally withdrew their bid.

Cincinnati was one of six cities on a list of potential GOP convention sites.

"Prior to the site selection committee vote, Cincinnati respectfully withdrew their bid from the process, based on the criteria set forth by the RNC for the main arena,'' the Republican National Committee (RNC) said in a press release.

FEMA

One potential 2016 Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Rand Paul, was in Cincinnati Friday night; and another is coming in June - former Florida governor Jeb Bush, for a private fundraising event at the Queen City Club.

According to the invitation obtained by WVXU, Bush will be here for high-priced fundraiser for the Republican National Committee (RNC). RNC chairman Reince Priebus will also be on hand.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Work is officially underway on the next phase of the Banks project.

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley and Hamilton County Commission President Chris Monzel poured the first concrete pillar for expansion west of the Freedom Center.

Monzel calls the project a major economic driver for the region.

"We could yield a return on investment as high as 7-to-1," says Monzel. "To me that's a smart investment. That is a great ROI that will contribute to continue to strengthen our county  and our city."

An eight-member delegation of the Republican National Committee(RNC) toured Cincinnati today to see if the city might be a suitable location for the 2016 Republican National Convention.

Cincy2016, the local committee pushing for the convention, gave the group from the RNC a tour of US Bank Arena, the proposed venue for the convention; the Cincinnati Convention Center, and downtown hotels.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati made the first cut of cities vying for the 2016 Republican National Convention, the Republican National Committee (RNC) announced this afternoon.

Eight cities from around the country made formal presentations to the RNC’s site selection committee last month;  and two of them were eliminated by the committee today – Columbus and Phoenix.

But Cincinnati, which wants to hold the convention at US Bank Arena, was one of six to survive the first cut – a list that also included Cleveland.

Alright, let’s assume for the moment that Cincinnati does land the 2016 Republican presidential nominating convention.

What would the chances be that the eventual nominee of the GOP turns out to be from Ohio, the host state, or right across the river in Kentucky?

It’s a long shot, but by no means outside the realm of possibility.

Despite having an Electoral College map that works decidedly against them, the Republicans seemingly have more potential 2016 presidential contenders than Heinz has varieties.

There’s an old saying in the game of golf – “never up, never in.”

It means that if your ball is on the green, a long way from the cup, you have to swing your putter with an extra “oomph” to get the ball somewhere close to the hole. That way, if you don’t sink it, you have an easy tap-in putt.

Sarah Ramsey

There is no question that the three Indiana riverfront casinos within easy driving distance of downtown Cincinnati’s Horseshoe Casino have taken a financial hit over the past year.

But revenues have declined in all 13 Indiana venues, and none more so than the three southeastern Indiana casinos in the Cincinnati market - Hollywood Casino in Lawrenceburg, Rising Star Casino Resort and Belterra Casino.

And it has been going on for the past four years – long before Horseshoe Casino in Cincinnati opened its doors.

We’ve seen big, high profile conventions and other gatherings in Cincinnati plenty of times in recent years.

We’ve had the national NAACP, the national FOP and others. We’ve hosted Major League Baseball’s Civil Rights game twice; and, next year, Great American Ball Park will host another whopper, the All Star Game.

All have brought beaucoup dollars into the city.

But the big prize might be right around the corner – a national presidential nominating convention. The Republican National Convention to be exact.

Cincinnati Magazine

  You might be a native, or maybe you just moved here, but, really, just “How Cincy Are You?”  For their February issue the folks Cincinnati Magazine put together several quizzes you can take to determine your Cincinnati-ousness, along with helpful hints on everything from how to run the Flying Pig to how to remove a chili stain.

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