Cincinnati Zoo

Provided, Cincinnati Zoo

  The Passenger Pigeon was once probably the most numerous bird on earth. Population estimates from the 19th century ranged from between one and four billion. But on September 1,1914, the last Passenger Pigeon, Martha, died at the Cincinnati Zoo.

ArtWorks

  John A. Ruthven is a naturalist, author, lecturer, and internationally acknowledged master of wildlife art, often called the “20th Century Audubon.” In 1974, he led the effort to save the last of the Cincinnati Zoo'’s 19th century bird pagodas – the one where Martha, the last of the passenger pigeons, had once lived. Mr. Ruthven is the final speaker in the Cincinnati Zoo’'s Barrows Lecture Series this year (the event is sold out). The Zoo’'s Thane Maynard talks with John Ruthven, who is the recipient of the 2014 Cincinnati Zoo Wildlife Conservation Award.

In January of this year, Thane Maynard spoke to Joel Greenburg, author of A Feathered River Across the Sky: The Passenger Pigeon's Flight to Extinction. You can hear that interview by clicking here: Thane and Joel Greenburg

Provided, Cincinnati Zoo

  Next Thursday, August 28, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden presents its fourth-annual Plant Trials Day, where the zoo shares the results of its testing program. Learn about the best new plants most suitable for our area, and hear presentations by horticulture experts on a variety of gardening topics, perennials, miniature trees, selecting the best plant materials and more. Here to give us a preview of Plant Trials Day are the Director of Horticulture at the Cincinnati Zoo, Steve Foltz, and zoo horticulturist Scott Beuerlein.

Mark Heyne / WVXU News

There were lots of  "oohs and ahhhs" from the crowd of adults and kids who gathered to see 8-day-old Mondika's first public appearance at the Cincinnati Zoo Tuesday morning. 

The baby Western Lowland gorilla's public debut took place in the Zoo's outdoor gorilla yard along with Asha, the mother,  Jomo, the father, and family members M'linzi, Samantha, Anju and baby Gladys.

Cincinnatii Zoo

The Cincinnati Zoo is expecting a baby gorilla any day now. But, the little tyke won't actually belong to Cincinnati.

Neither the unborn gorilla nor its parents, Asha and Jomo, are Cincinnatians, so to speak. Though all three will live here, ownership falls to the parents' zoo of origin.

It's all part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan which helps zoos in North America regulate breeding. Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard says it's complicated but important.

A Boy and a Jaguar

Jul 11, 2014
Provided, Panthera

  Dr. Alan Rabinowitz is one of the world’s leading big cat experts, and has been called ‘The Indiana Jones of Wildlife Conservation’ by TIME Magazine. He has traveled the world on behalf of wildlife conservation and is responsible for the world's first jaguar sanctuary, the Cockscomb Basin Jaguar Preserve in the mountains of Belize. The Cincinnati Zoo’s Thane Maynard had a chance to talk with Alan Rabinowitz about his work, and A Boy and a Jaguar, his picture book that tells the real-life story of his own childhood.

Kelly Brown - Registrar, Buffalo Zoo

The Cincinnati Zoo says a baby rhino born in Buffalo was conceived using cryogenically preserved sperm.

A female Indian rhino calf was conceived at the Buffalo Zoo through artificial insemination. The sperm came from Cincinnati's former rhino named "Jimmy" who died in 2004. The calf named "Monica" was born June 5 weighing 144 pounds.

In a release, the Cincinnati Zoo calls this "a major victory for endangered species around the world."

The Zoo also says:

The 90-Second Naturalist Podcast and Archives

Jun 10, 2014

Get a daily glimpse into the natural world from Cincinnati Public Radio with The 90-Second Naturalist.

Hosted by Thane Maynard, Director of the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, the mission of his work is to tell the story of biological diversity, natural history, and wildlife conservation to the general public.

Provided, Lukuru Foundation

The next speaker in the Cincinnati Zoo Barrows Lecture Series is Dr. Terese Hart. Dr. Hart is the director of a Lukuru Foundation project that is working to create a new national park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. On Wednesday, May 28 at 7:00 PM, she will present, “The Challenges of Protecting Wildlife in the Congo.” Dr. Hart spoke with the Zoo’s Thane Maynard about her work.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The Cincinnati Zoo's newest giraffe made her public debut Thursday. Nasha roamed the yard with mother, Tessa; sister, Lulu; and two other female giraffes.

There are five giraffe species. The ones here are Maasai Giraffe.

Once Nasha is weaned and matured she'll be considered for breeding programs at other zoos. Lulu will be moved to The Wilds in southeastern Ohio this fall.

Baby giraffe born at Cincinnati Zoo

Apr 28, 2014
twitter.com/cincinnatizoo

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden welcomed a new female giraffe calf Monday morning.  Just before 4 a.m., Tessa started showing signs of labor and by 7 a.m. the baby started to emerge.  This is Tessa's third calf.

Here's the first video of the Zoo's newest addition:

Earth Day 2014

Apr 22, 2014

  Many consider Earth Day 1970 the birth of the modern environmental movement. Since then, each year on April 22, millions of people all over the world take some action in support of a greener, cleaner, more sustainable environment.

International Rhino Foundation

Bill Konstant serves as Program Officer for the International Rhino Foundation, traveling the world to build collaborative programs that help bring an end to poaching. As part of the Cincinnati Zoo Barrows Lecture series, Mr. Konstant will present “The World’s Rarest Rhinos” Wednesday evening April 23, providing a look at the last three decades of wildlife conservation, as well as a glimpse into what the future looks like for the world's five rhino species. Earlier, the Zoo’s Thane Maynard had a chance to talk with Bill Konstant about the world’s rhino population.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Rain barrels decorated by students and artists from around the Tristate are on display at the Cincinnati Zoo. The 2nd annual Rain Barrel Art Project sponsored by Save Local Waters is part of a push to raise awareness about environmental education and, of course, to get more people to capture rain water to reduce water usage.

On a beautiful and busy day at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, the public got its first glimpse of Kilua, a baby okapi born on November 30, 2013 to mother Kuvua and father Kiloro.  Kilua is the Cincinnati Zoo’s 15th okapi birth since 1989 but the first offspring from this couple.

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