Cincinnati Zoo

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is presenting its 23rd annual Barrows Conservation Lecture Series next month. Since 1993, the series has brought a slate of esteemed naturalists and scientists to Cincinnati to address wildlife issues and global conservation efforts. Joining us today with interviews of the speakers taking part in this year’'s lecture series is Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard.

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Three lion cubs born at the Cincinnati Zoo have been referred to as “1, 2 and 3” since their birth last November.  But now they have proper names. 

The cub formerly known as 1 is now Huruma, which means compassion in in Swahili.  Cincinnati Zoo keepers picked that name to honor a colleague from the St. Louis Zoo who recently died.  Becky Wanner helped raise the cubs’ mother, Imani.  Huruma is also being referred to as Uma.

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The Cincinnati Zoo has announced the three lion cubs born in November are all female.  A release says the cubs got their first check up today.  The zoo now wants to name the cubs and is asking for suggestions via Facebook and Twitter, using  #CZBGLionCubs.

Youtube.com / Cincinnati Zoo

The Cincinnati Zoo is celebrating the arrival of rare painted dog pups.

“It’s been 30 years since painted dog pups were born at the Cincinnati Zoo, and none of the pups from that litter survived," says Zoo Director Thane Maynard. "So, if all goes well, these will be the first pups of this species to grow up here."

Zoo officials aren't certain how many pups were born. They estimate it's between seven to 10. The first pup arrived Monday morning, January 5. The last was born at 9:50 p.m.

More about painted dogs:

  In 1964, Clyde Peeling opened Reptiland in Allenwood, Pennsylvania and for the last 50 years, has been educating generations of visitors about the importance of reptiles in nature. Thane Maynard of the Cincinnati Zoo recently had the chance to talk with Clyde Peeling about his half-century at Reptiland.

Enno Meyer / Cincinnati Museum Center

In the late 1800's Cincinnatians loved Indians and Indians loved Cincinnati.

Wild West shows at the end of the 19th century were big because the frontier had disappeared and people were enamored with all things Indian. So when a Wild West show in Bellevue, Kentucky closed up, and Cree Indians from Montana were stranded, the Cincinnati Zoo came to the rescue, as far as the Native Americans were concerned.

 We all know the environmental importance of trees. And most homeowners realize they have a significant intrinsic worth as well. The right tree in the proper setting can define a landscape and add significantly to a home’'s resale value. This is the perfect time of year to plant or relocate trees, but picking, positioning and planting a tree takes some careful thought and planning.

Cincinnati Museum Center

When one of the Cincinnati Zoo's Sumatran rhinos died last year, his remains were given to the Museum Center. Friday the Museum Center is unveiling a mounted display of "Ipuh."

Ipuh came to the Cincinnati Zoo in 1991 as part of a captive breeding program between the United States and Indonesia. He was one of the last Sumatran rhinos taken from the wild and was believed to be around 33 years old when he died.

Cincinnati Zoo / Provided

Baby watch is on at the Cincinnati Zoo.

Zookeepers noticed three-year-old lion "Imani" was putting on weight and began speculating she might be pregnant. A pregnancy test indicates that just may be the case.

"An ultrasound is not an option for Imani," says Bill Swanson, Director of Animal Research at the Zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW). "But elevated levels of progesterone in fecal samples and the presence of relaxin in urine provide presumptive evidence of pregnancy.”

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