Cincinnati Zoo

Tuesday, May 19, the Cincinnati Opera returns to its first home, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, where performances were held from 1920 through 1971.

Cincinnati Zoo

The Cincinnati Zoo has produced what's believed to be the first non-human offspring using "glass" sperm. They are kittens named Elsa and Vito.

The Center for Conservation & Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) harvested domestic cat sperm and preserved it in ultra-rapid freezing liquid nitrogen to form "glass" rather than ice crystals. This process is called vitrification.


The first Earth Day was 45 years ago. And on April 22 every year since then, people around the world celebrate the day by taking some action to improve the environment. Joining us to talk about the progress we’'ve made to create a greener, cleaner, more sustainable environment, worldwide and here in our region, are Cincinnati Nature Center Chief Naturalist and Adult Program Manager Bill Creasey; Brewster Rhoads, executive director of Green Umbrella Regional Sustainability Alliance; and, Scott Beuerlein, Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden horticulturist and chairman of the Taking Root campaign.

The Zoo's Earth Day celebration, “Party for the Planet,” takes place April 23; the 2015 Midwest Regional Sustainability Summit will by held May 1 at the Xavier University Cintas Center, registration is open until April 29. And for recycling anything in Hamilton County, check out the Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District website

  Jon Cohen is a correspondent with Science magazine and author of several books, including Almost Chimpanzee: Searching for What Makes Us Human, In Rainforests, Labs, Sanctuaries, and Zoos. He spoke recently with Thane Maynard from the Cincinnati Zoo about his interest in wildlife and his recent article called Zoo Futures.

  Some of us take vacations to the same place each year, comfortable in knowing what to expect, the beach or Disney World, maybe. But many people use their vacations to travel outside their comfort zones, and open themselves up to new cultures, people, places and experiences.

  Thirty-five highly respected educators from the United States and Canada have been selected as this year'’s Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education Grosvenor Teacher Fellows. The Fellows will take expeditions to locations such as Iceland, Greenland and Antarctica, for hands-on experience, professional development, and what most would say, a trip of a lifetime.

Cincinnati Zoo / Provided

The Cincinnati Zoo has a new gorilla. The sixteen-year-old Western lowland silverback comes from the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas.

Harambe brings the total number of gorillas at the zoo to ten. Harambe weighs in at 419 pounds and is being placed in a social group with two 19-year-old females. They will not be bred together.

The Zoo says Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered in the wild, with less than 175-thousand individuals.

Cincinnati Zoo

Sunshine, a white African lion at the Cincinnati Zoo, died following surgery. He was 17 -years- old. The average age of white lions living in North American zoos  is 16.8 years.

The zoo says he and his brother Future were loaned permanently by Sigfried and Roy in 1998.  Future was euthanized in December, 2014.

  Dr. Linda Bender is a veterinarian, but much more than that. She is a passionate advocate for animals and author of “Animal Wisdom: Learning from the Spiritual Lives of Animals”, which illuminates the undeniable ability for animals to restore our ecological, emotional and spiritual balance. Dr. Bender recently spoke with Thane Maynard from the Cincinnati Zoo.

  Michael Bean has, literally and figuratively, written the book on wildlife conservation law and has directed the wildlife conservation activities of the Environmental Defense Fund since 1977.