Cincinnati Zoo

Cincinnati Zoo
5:57 am
Fri November 21, 2014

How Indians came to live at the Cincinnati Zoo

There were two groups of Native Americans who lived at the zoo: Cree and Sicangu Sioux.
Enno Meyer Cincinnati Museum Center

In the late 1800's Cincinnatians loved Indians and Indians loved Cincinnati.

Wild West shows at the end of the 19th century were big because the frontier had disappeared and people were enamored with all things Indian. So when a Wild West show in Bellevue, Kentucky closed up, and Cree Indians from Montana were stranded, the Cincinnati Zoo came to the rescue, as far as the Native Americans were concerned.

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Cincinnati Edition - 513-419-7100
1:30 am
Mon November 17, 2014

Fall and Winter gardening and tree tips from the experts

 We all know the environmental importance of trees. And most homeowners realize they have a significant intrinsic worth as well. The right tree in the proper setting can define a landscape and add significantly to a home’'s resale value. This is the perfect time of year to plant or relocate trees, but picking, positioning and planting a tree takes some careful thought and planning.

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Science
5:00 am
Fri October 31, 2014

How rare rhino's remains could help his endangered brethren

Ipuh lived at the Cincinnati Zoo for more than 20 years. Now his remains will live on at the Museum Center.
Credit Cincinnati Museum Center

When one of the Cincinnati Zoo's Sumatran rhinos died last year, his remains were given to the Museum Center. Friday the Museum Center is unveiling a mounted display of "Ipuh."

Ipuh came to the Cincinnati Zoo in 1991 as part of a captive breeding program between the United States and Indonesia. He was one of the last Sumatran rhinos taken from the wild and was believed to be around 33 years old when he died.

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Cincinnati Zoo
12:28 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Could Cincinnati Zoo lion be pregnant?

Zookeepers say Imani is gaining weight and may be pregnant.
Credit Cincinnati Zoo / Provided

Baby watch is on at the Cincinnati Zoo.

Zookeepers noticed three-year-old lion "Imani" was putting on weight and began speculating she might be pregnant. A pregnancy test indicates that just may be the case.

"An ultrasound is not an option for Imani," says Bill Swanson, Director of Animal Research at the Zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW). "But elevated levels of progesterone in fecal samples and the presence of relaxin in urine provide presumptive evidence of pregnancy.”

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Cincinnati Edition - 513-419-7100
6:30 am
Mon October 27, 2014

The Zoo's Sarah Navarro is back from her NatGeo fellowship in the Canadian Maritimes

Sarah Navarro and ship at Iles de la Madeleine, Quebec
Jessica Metz

  Earlier this year, 25 highly-respected educators from the United States and Canada were selected as 2014 Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education Grosvenor Teacher Fellows.

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