Cincinnati Zoo

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 The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden will present its sixth annual Plant Trials Day symposium on August 18. 

Hippos Say Hello

Jul 21, 2016
Ann Thompson / WVXU

Henry, the Cincinnati Zoo's new male hippo, did some heavy duty courting Thursday, the opening day of Hippo Cove. He's been by himself for 20 years at another zoo and is now joined by female, Bibi. Zookeepers say, however, she's in charge and tires of Henry chasing her around.

Cincinnati Zoo (taken by a drone)

Henry the hippo has said goodbye to the Dickerson Park Zoo in Springfield, Missouri and is now at the Cincinnati Zoo. Henry, 34, described as "one of the most charismatic animals at the zoo, is joined by a 17 year old female, named Bibi. .A new exhibit will open July 21st. In order to house them the Cincinnati Zoo had to build an elaborate water filtration system, as described in this story which originally aired last summer.

Here's an encore presentation of the report:

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The Cincinnati Zoo's gorilla exhibit is reopen with new safety precautions in place. 

The exhibit was closed May 28, when a 3-year-old boy got into the enclosure. Zoo staff shot and killed a gorilla to rescue him. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The mother of the toddler who climbed through a barrier and fell into the Cincinnati Zoo gorilla enclosure will not face charges. That's the decision from Hamilton County Prosecutor Joseph Deters. The zoo fatally shot a gorilla while rescuing the child.

Provided / Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden

The Cincinnati Zoo will reopen its Gorilla World exhibit Tuesday, June 7, with a new barrier in place. The zoo  says, "The new barrier railing is 42" high with solid wood beams at the top and on the bottom with knotted rope netting."

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Last Saturday, the Cincinnati Zoo's Dangerous Animal Response Team was forced to shoot and kill a critically-endangered gorilla after it began dragging a 4-year old boy who had fallen into the exhibit.

After the boy climbed through a public barrier and fell into a moat, 17-year old Harambe, a male gorilla, grabbed the child and began violently dragging and throwing him around.

WCPO

Update 06/01/16:  The family of the child who fell into the exhibit issued this statement Wednesday:

“Our child has had a checkup by his doctor and is still doing well. We continue to praise God for His grace and mercy, and to be thankful to the Cincinnati Zoo for their actions taken to protect our child.

We are also very appreciative for the expressions of concern and support that have been sent to us. Some have offered money to the family, which we do not want and will not accept. If anyone wishes to make a gift, we recommend a donation to the Cincinnati Zoo in Harambe’s name.”

The family continues to decline all interview and meeting requests.

Update 05/31/16:  Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters issued this statement Tuesday morning: 

“The incident at the Cincinnati Zoo involving the young child who fell into the gorilla enclosure is under investigation by the Cincinnati Police Department.  Once their investigation is concluded, they will confer with our office on possible criminal charges.  When the investigation and review are complete, we will update the media.”

Provided / Cincinnati Zoo

Update 05/29/16 at 3 p.m.: The Cincinnati Zoo says it had to make the "difficult decision" to kill 17-year-old gorilla Harambe because tranquilizing was not an option.

Dr. George Uetz is a professor of biology at the University of Cincinnati and Alex Sweger is a graduate student and together they have discovered a new species of wolf spider with audible mating songs that sound a lot like a cat purr. Last summer they presented their findings to the Acoustical Society of America. They sat down with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard to talk about wolf spiders and their mating songs.

Wikipedia.com

Most crops grown for their fruits, nuts, seeds and fiber require pollination by insects, such as bees and butterflies. These pollinators are responsible for much of the food we eat and play a critical role in ensuring the production of seeds in most flowering plants.

wheatoncollege.edu

Dr. John Kricher is longtime professor of biology at Wheaton College who teaches courses in ecology, ornithology, and vertebrate evolution.

Provided / Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden

Update 3/22/2016: The Cincinnati Zoo reports the mother of the five cubs, "Willow,"  has died. "Cheetahs are a fragile species and this difficult birth proved to be too much for her to pull through" said Thane Maynard, Director of the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, in a statement. "Willow was able to contribute to the survival of her species by producing five cheetah cubs.  Without the C-section, we likely would have lost both the mom and the cubs."

Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden

Update 5:45 p.m.: A news release from the Cincinnati Zoo now says two bears, Berit and 26-year-old Little One "took advantage of an open den door" and got into a service hallway. The two are "resting in their den" and could be back for viewing as early as Friday.  

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden kicks-off its annual Barrows Conservation Lecture Series this month. Over the years, the series has brought dozens of internationally acclaimed scientists, explorers and naturalists into town to address wildlife issues and global conservation efforts.

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