Cincinnati streetcar

Downtown drivers can expect Seventh Street to be down to one lane between Main and Walnut streets starting Monday, due to electric utility work for the streetcar project.

Main Street is also being reduced to one lane between Sixth and Seventh streets. There will be no left turn on to Main Street from Seventh and motorists are advised to get to Main Street via Sycamore to Sixth Street.

The lane closures will last for about a month, said John Deatrick, the project executive for the Cincinnati streetcar project.

A Cincinnati Council Committee tasked with overseeing the streetcar project wants more information on different ways to pay for it.  Those funds could be used to extend it to the Uptown area near the University of Cincinnati, or for dollars to operate the loop now being built in Downtown and Over-the-Rhine.  

The Major Transportation Committee Tuesday asked for more details on special improvement districts or special assessment districts.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati officials said Wednesday they still do not know the cost of delaying work on the streetcar project for most of last month.  They're still calculating that number and also the effect on the timeline to build the first phase.  

Council delayed the project for several weeks before deciding on December 19th to let it move forward.  Officials also say the cold weather has caused some delays.  

The first actual streetcar will arrive in the city in March 2015.  

An independent audit of the streetcar shows it would cost from $25 million to $50 million more to complete the project than to stop it, the mayor rejected an offer by the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) to cover streetcar operating costs, and council is meeting this afternoon to continue debate. With the deadline to receive federal money fast approaching. How things stand now with the streetcar.

Update 12/18/13 @ 9:30 PM: 

Cincinnati Council will likely vote Thursday on whether the city's controversial streetcar project will continue. 

Construction has been on hold since December 4th.  Now the group will decide whether to let work resume or finally pull the plug on the plan. 

So far the city has spent $34 million on the streetcar project.  An independent audit firm reported Wednesday it will cost anywhere from $16 to $46 million to cancel the streetcar or about $69 million to complete it. 

Update 12/17/13 @ 6:20 PM:  Council members Young, Simpson and Seelbach released a statement on SORTA's offer to take responsibility for streetcar operating cost.  A portion reads:

Six Council members sent a letter to the Federal Transit Administration about the city's streetcar project.  The text of the letter is below.

Meanwhile, Council is scheduled to hear public comments again on the project Wednesday afternoon starting at 1:30.  The streetcar committee will hold a meeting Thursday at 9 a.m. to learn more about an audit to determine the costs of stopping the project versus continuing it.  The full Council will meet Thursday at 2 p.m. to take a vote on stopping or continuing the project.

FTA letter:

Dear Mr. Rogoff:

OK, let’s get this straight.

This new mayor of Cincinnati, John Cranley, ran this fall and won big on a platform where the top three priorities were this:

  1. Kill the streetcar project.
  2. Kill the streetcar project
  3. Kill the streetcar project.

Several days ago, he seemed well on the way to doing just that.

Provided from City of Cincinnati

Federal transit officials Friday morning refused Mayor John Cranley's request to extend the Dec. 19 deadline for pulling $45 million in federal money from the streetcar project.

But the mayor's spokesman, Jay Kincaid, says Federal Transit Administrator Peter Rogoff did agree to talk to pro-streetcar advocates to allow them to make a pitch for more time.

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