Cincinnati State


More than 200,000 US service members return to civilian life each year. For many veterans, and their families, that transition is filled with challenges. 


Founded by the Cincinnati School Board in 1966, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College was originally known as The Cincinnati Cooperative School of Technology.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati State's newly chosen 6th president made her first public comments Friday. Monica Posey says her goal is to take the college to the next level.

Provided / Cincinnati State

Cincinnati State's Board of Trustees has chosen interim president Monica Posey to serve as the college's next president.


Last month, People's Liberty announced its latest group of grant recipients. Each of the eight grantees receives $10,000 to make a positive impact on their communities. Projects range from Brick Gardens, an urban gardening model using indoor vertical towers to grow produce, to The Costumed Sidewalk Parades, spontaneous theme-based parades inviting people to explore new parts of the city.


For many young women, prom is an important part of the high school experience. However, it’'s not usually cheap to attend; girl's’ dresses can cost as much as several hundred dollars. Nonprofit organization Kenzie’'s Closet provides prom attire free of charge to young ladies from accredited high schools. Since its creation in 2006, it’'s dressed almost 3,500 girls for their proms.

According to ManpowerGroup’s most recent Talent Shortage Survey, skilled trade jobs continue to be the most difficult for U.S. employers to fill. And while employers struggle to find properly trained electricians, machinists, plumbers, and other skilled workers, scores of those workers struggle to find good jobs that match their abilities.

Provided / Neighborhood Foundations

Going to college, raising a family, and holding down a job isn't easy.  And it's even more difficult for a single parent.  But for 48 families, there's help now.  The Scholar House has its grand opening in Newport, Wednesday.

Provided / Cincinnati State

Update 5:38 p.m.: Cincinnati State says Provost Monica Posey will serve as interim president.

Cincinnati will apply for nearly $33 million in federal funding for a bridge to maintain access to Cincinnati State as part the I-75 / I-74 rebuilding process.


It may not be too long before your co-worker is a robot. That robot might eventually take your job, according to this video.

Cincinnati State's professors have a new contract.  The three year deal between the Board of Trustees and the college's chapter of the American Association of University Professors will take effect immediately. 

A release says salaries will increase 1.25 percent in the first year 1.5 percent in the second year and 2 percent in the third year.  The Board of Trustees approved the agreement yesterday.  It was approved by a unanimous vote of AAUP members August 22. 

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley said Thursday there could be a solution to maintain interstate access to Cincinnati State as the work to rebuild Interstate 75 continues.  

The current plan calls for the eastbound I-74 ramp to Central Parkway to be removed.  Cincinnati State officials have been complaining about the issue for months.  

Cranley raised the access issue with Ohio Governor John Kasich during a meeting at city hall on Wednesday.  

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Mechanical engineering and industrial design students at Cincinnati State will soon be better equipped to design, develop and manufacture some of the world's most sophisticated products.

Siemens, at its historic Norwood plant, announced it is giving $66.8M worth of Siemens software to Cincinnati State. Governor John Kasich says 500 Ohio companies use Siemens software, including Proctor and Gamble, GE Aviation and Ethicon, and that gives students who know how to use it, an advantage in advancing their careers.

Cincinnati State Technical and Community College

  At the same time that thousands of people in the tri-state are unemployed or under-employed, many local companies are unable to find enough skilled workers to meet their demands. An upcoming event at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College will showcase the school’s programs and degrees that train students with the skills they need to find a job in today’s economy.