Cincinnati Reds

Food Network

After finishing second Sunday on “Cutthroat Kitchen,” Great American Ball Park executive chef James Major returns to Food Network 8 p.m. Thursday for the “Chopped: Impossible” finals.

Major, a former U.S. Navy cook -- and two other “Chopped” champs who won over the last three weeks -- will compete for $15,000 and a chance to go one-on-one in the kitchen against Robert Irvine, a “Chopped: Impossible” judge and and star of the network's "Restaurant Impossible."

Cincinnati Reds

The Cincinnati Reds are naming Dick Williams as the club's new Senior Vice President and General Manager. Walt Jockety is staying with the team as President of Baseball Operations.

Food Network

Not just a home run, but an inside-the-park home run. That’s how Great American Ball Park executive chef James Major advanced to the “Chopped: Impossible” finals airing 8 p.m. Nov. 12 on Food Network.

Judge Geoffrey Zakarian called Major’s walnut and balsamic sponge cake with peanut butter cream “a well done dessert, an inside-the-park home run.”

The “Chopped: Impossible” contestants had to concoct a dessert using a meat lover’s sub sandwich, ostrich egg, chunky peanut butter and balsamic vinegar.

Major also will compete on "Cutthroat Kitchen" 10 p.m. Sunday on the Food Network in an episode called "The Hunt For Bread October," says Michael Anderson, Reds public relations manager.  

Food Network

Can he do it again?

Great American Ball Park executive chef James Major, who won a special “Chopped” competition for baseball park chefs last year, appears on the Food Network’s “Chopped: Impossible” at 8 p.m. Thursday.

Major, who attended the Culinary Institute of America, is competing against 11 other “Chopped” champs in the four-part tournament, says Michael Anderson, Reds public relations manager.

The winner receives $15,000 and a face-off with Robert Irvine, the “Restaurant: Impossible” star and “Chopped: Impossible” judge.

Kansas City Royals

Game 2 of the World Series is Wednesday with the  Kansas City Royals up one after winning 5-4 in 14 innings Tuesday night.  The Royals say they have the pieces to go all the way against the New York Mets. 

The biggest splash was when the Royals picked up pitcher Johnny Cueto in a trade with the Cincinnati Reds last July; and he will be on the mound for Kansas City tonight.


Score it Error: Ferrell. Or #FarrellFail.

Comedian Will Ferrell’s HBO special Saturday about playing all nine positions for Major League Baseball teams last March was a colossal disappointment.

“Ferrell Takes The Field, available on HBO the rest the month, features the “Anchorman” and former “Saturday Night Live” star playing for 10 teams – including the Reds – in a marathon March day in Arizona.

Unfortunately, Ferrell fixated on the misguided concept of staying in character – as a 47-year-old man who believed he had the talent to play in the big leagues. To me, the hour was filled with far too much phony  bluster and braggadocio, and artificial angst about being traded or released, as he bounced from club to club.


 On this date in TV Kiese History…

Aug. 26, 1939:  The Cincinnati Reds played the Brooklyn Dodgers in the first televised Major League Baseball game seen by the few people with TV sets in the New York City area 76 years ago today.

Red Barber, who started his professional sports announcing career doing Reds radio for Crosley Broadcasting’s WLW-AM and WSAI-M, broadcast the game on NBC’s experimental TV station W2XBS.

During the game from Ebbets Field, Barber also did the first TV commercial -- for Procter & Gamble’s Ivory Soap.

Provided / Hamilton County Commission

The replacement of seats at Great American Ball Park earlier this year came in under budget. That's in part because the project made a little money. 


Comedian Will Ferrell’s stint as a Cincinnati Reds third baseman – part of his marathon day playing every position for 10 teams during spring training – debuts on HBO 10 p.m. Sept. 12.

“Ferrell Takes The Field” was filmed at five Arizona ball parks on March 12 as a one-hour special from Funny or Die, in partnership with Major League Baseball.

John Kiesewetter

As he celebrates his 73rd birthday today, Marty Brennaman sounds as excited as that rookie big league radio announcer who joined Joe Nuxhall in 1974. That’s what made Marty a Hall of Famer.

Reds fans will say he’s best known for his calls of the 1990 World Series, Jay Bruce’s Central Division clinching homer in 2010, or Pete Rose’s hit number 4,192, but to me Marty’s at his best when the Reds are at their worst.  Just listen. Marty and Jeff Brantley or Jim Kelch keep fans laughing and engaged through this awful season.