Cincinnati Preservation Association

  As the Cincinnati Preservation Association is celebrating its 50th anniversary, the organization'’s original mission to save Native American and early settlement sites has evolved to saving individual buildings and reviving entire neighborhoods.

A revitalization study of Cincinnati's Walnut Hills neighborhoods gets underway Tuesday afternoon.  

Margo Warminski with the Cincinnati Preservation Association called it a data driven planning tool.

“It was created in response to the issues in older industrial cities that have lots of population and job loss mostly in the Midwest and East but elsewhere,” Warminski said.  “And as a result they’ve got large inventories of vacant, often decaying, buildings many of which are historic and often they’re torn down without an overall plan.”

More than 17,000 votes have been counted and the results are in. Here are the Cincinnati Preservation Associations's top 50 historic buildings in Cincinnati.

Executive Director Paul Muller says more than 150 buildings were nominated.

The Delta Queen topped the list with 2302 votes followed by the Administration Building at God's Bible School & College with 1725 votes.

Mark Heyne / WVXU News

There are just a few days left to cast your vote in the Cincinnati Preservation Association's 50 for 50.  The aim is to pick the top 50 historic buildings and sites that help define the city.  Music Hall, the Museum Center at Union Terminal, and the Roebling Suspension Bridge are just a few of the sites on the list.

The top 50 will be part of CPA's 50th anniversary exhibit this fall at the Cincinnati Museum Center.

For 50 years, the Cincinnati Preservation Association has worked to identify and save some of the architectural and historic buildings in our city. In celebration of this anniversary, Paul Muller and Margo Warminski from the CPA join Jane Durrell to talk about the group’s mission, victories and focus for the future.

Pages