Cincinnati Police

Michael E. Keating

The Cincinnati Police Department reports it needs a recruit class for each of the next two to three years to maintain its staffing level.

The request was made in the department's budget presentation Monday to a Council committee. Budget manager Ella Topham explained how it would work.

"We'd like to target that recruit class to begin in February each year, and for the next two or three years that would be probably a 30 member recruit class," Topham said.

The department wants to maintain a sworn strength of 1,000 officers.

A Cincinnati council committee continues a debate about whether the city's police chief should be able to commission private police officers.

It allows those individuals to perform special police duties and they typically work security details for businesses and organizations.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police  investigation of an officer-involved shooting in East Price Hill continues. Detectives are trying to trace where Christian Jackson got the shotgun he allegedly pointed at officers. They are also enhancing the police video shot at the scene.

At a Monday afternoon news conference police detailed the chronology of events leading up to the shooting on Fairbanks Avenue, near Warsaw, after midnight.

Chronology of events:

Jay Hanselman

The Cincinnati Police Department is celebrating the completion of its first recruit class in more than six years.  

56 officers and one firefighter who took the 26-week training courses received their commissions Friday during a ceremony in Downtown Cincinnati at The Masonic Center.  They will now spend the next 13 weeks with training officers.  

The class valedictorian was James Hutchings, who is currently a Cincinnati Firefighter.  He went thru police training to be a sworn officer inside the fire department.  Hutchings had this advice to his fellow graduates.

Michael E. Keating

If the frigid temperatures are forcing you to spend more time inside, you can bet the criminals are doing the same.

Cincinnati Police Lt. Col. Jim Whalen has seen it year after year. "Bad guys stay inside. There are fewer opportunities for crime and disorder and therefore fewer incidents occur and fewer people are out and about... that are even available to be victimized."

Whalen says he does see a decline in all types of crime at the onset of drastic weather changes.

The more dramatic the weather the more dramatic the effect.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

 Cincinnati's first police recruit class in several years is on track to graduate at the end of next month. That graduation is set for February 27.

56 members are in the 26-week training program. Around 2,500 people took the test to be a city police officer.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Police are pointing to CIRV, the Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence, as making a dent in Over the Rhine crime.

Shootings are down 74-percent and robberies 12-percent. Assistant Chief Jim Whalen says police are in the process of arresting 83 people, mostly drug dealers, who operate to the west of the trendy bar and restaurant area. They started identifying the suspects about four months ago.

Jay Hanselman

Cradle Cincinnati is announcing a couple new partnerships in an effort to prevent sleep-related infant deaths.  It is called the “Cribs for Kids” program.  

One of those involves the United Way's 211 line.  It connects people with community resources.  

Hamilton County Commissioner and Cradle Cincinnati co-chairman Todd Portune said it will help get baby cribs to parents who need them.

  Dealing with the stresses and tragedies that often come with police work requires a special type of mental toughness, but there are times when even those who protect us daily need some assistance. The Cincinnati Police Department's independently contracted psychologist, Dr. James Daum, is profiled in the November issue of Cincinnati Magazine and he joins us to talk about the work he does to help officers cope with the challenges unique to their job.

npr.org

  Tension has been running high in Ferguson, Missouri as the community awaits a decision from a grand jury on whether a  police officer will be indicted for the shooting death of an unarmed black teen. Some experts say there could be riots similar to what happened in Los Angeles in 1992 in the Rodney King case if there's no indictment.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Officers, in the midst of a 30-day trial for body cameras, recorded an officer involved fatal shooting Sunday, helping to back up the story told by police and witnesses.

At about 6:45 p.m. Sunday officers went to 379 Rosemont Avenue in West Price Hill for a report of shots fired. That's where they found 37-year old  Christopher Mitchell with a gun to his head. Reportedly he had threatened suicide earlier in the day and pulled the trigger of another gun he held to his head, but it didn't go off. Friends say he had a history of depression and substance abuse.

Michael E. Keating

  

Michael Keating

Despite back-to-back shooting incidents downtown this week, shootings and violent crime remain down in Cincinnati compared to last year.

Chief Jeffrey Blackwell says police are stepping up patrols throughout the summer anyway to make sure people feel, and are, safe downtown.

"We're going to have a comprehensive incident command-based plan as we move forward to address every weekend event that we have from now through Labor Day and beyond even through Oktoberfest," says Blackwell.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati has 19 new police officers. The department's first class of lateral transfer recruits in more than six years was sworn in today. The officers all came from other Ohio agencies but still had to go through the city's training process. Chief Jeffrey Blackwell calls today's graduation exciting.

The new officers will hit the ground running with their first duty assignment working the Cincinnati Reds game on Saturday. They'll be paired with field training officers on Sunday and begin working in their assigned districts.

The barricades on McMicken Street to reduce prostitution are scheduled to be in place for about another month, but some residents want them to be removed now. 

Vanessa Sparks of the Mohawk Area Development Corporation told Cincinnati City Council's Law and Public Safety Committee this morning that the barricades are placing a burden on the neighborhood's residents.

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