Cincinnati Police

Cincinnati Fraternal Order of Police President Kathy Harrell had a blunt message for city council about police department staffing.

“We’re at the point right now that officers out on the street lives are in jeopardy,” Harrell said.  “I’m going to get a lot of slack for saying that, but I don’t care.  They’re out there with 187 less officers.”

Harrell testified Tuesday before Council's Law and Public Safety Committee.  

Without new officers, the department could be down 267 officers by the end of 2015.  Harrell said something has to change.

Michael Keating / Cincinnati Police

The Cincinnati Police Department is gearing up for several events this spring and summer focused on engaging the city's youth.  

Chief Jeffrey Blackwell outlined the plans Monday during a city council committee meeting.  He said the goal is to get kids off the streets and into a controlled environment.  

Blackwell said one new effort will be meetings with junior and senior class leaders at the city's high schools.

Jay Hanselman

Update:  Construction crews will soon begin work on a new police headquarters for Cincinnati's District Three.  Officials and residents gathered Monday for a ground breaking at the location on Ferguson Road near Glenway.  It will replace the current facility that was built in 1908.   New police chief Jeffrey Blackwell said it will be good for the department.  The $15 million project is expected to be completed in the spring 2015. 

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Economic Impact

An estimated 3,000 police officers from as far away as Ireland, are in Cincinnati for a convention that begins Monday and continues through Friday. The Convention and Visitors Bureau puts the economic impact at $4.5 million and contracted hotel room nights of more than 15,000 in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.

The police are looking for you. Not to worry though, they just want to hang out and have a good time.

Tuesday is National Night Out, an event aimed at raising crime prevention awareness and developing partnerships between neighborhoods and police officers. There are 8 mini block parties scheduled for around Cincinnati with free food and drinks.

Police and fire equipment will also be on hand for kids to see up close.

Nationwide, more than 37 million people are expected to participate.

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