Cincinnati Museum Center

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Rearranging historical artifacts is nothing new at the Cincinnati Museum Center.  Temporary exhibits come and go.  But rarely is the move a big production as it was Tuesday morning.

Three employees of a rigging company set up a trestle overhead as they prepared to move 3,500 pounds of iron in the form of a 150-year-old cannon.  They placed blankets around the barrel; and connected straps to a chain pulley system.  They were as careful as they could be.

Cincinnati Museum Center officials will decide soon on which firm will renovate the art deco landmark.

Last year, taxpayers approved a five-year, quarter cent sales tax to fund repairs to Union Terminal.

According to a statement, BHDP Architecture, GBBN architects and Quinn Evans Architects are the three finalists. The first two are Cincinnati-based companies. The third is based in Washington D.C. and Ann Arbor, MI.

Teams will present proposals in the coming weeks.

A final decision is expected by early April.

Provided / Cincinnati Museum Center

A world-famous archeologist who will speak in Cincinnati this week says learning about the past can lead to a good future.  Egyptologist Zahi Hawass says that's why it's important to keep uncovering history. 

He is among the archeologists and historians worldwide disturbed by the reports of ISIS fighters smashing antiquities at a museum in Mosul last week.

“We need to stand against all these terrorists.  The people who smash the monuments in Iraq, and in Syria, and in Libya,'' he says. "They are destroying our heritage."

Provided / Cincinnati Museum Center

The discovery of a rare Native American artifact in Newtown is exciting for archeologists, but it's also raising more questions. WVXU reporter Bill Rinehart joins us to provide details of the find.

Provided / Cincinnati Museum Center

The discovery of a rare Native American artifact in Newtown is exciting for archeologists, but it's also raising more questions.

Contractors digging a trench for a fiber optic box north of Newtown's administrative hall earlier this month found human remains.  They called police who quickly realized it was a burial site and not a crime scene.  They, in turn, called the Cincinnati Museum Center.

Cincinnati Museum Center / Provided

Cincinnati Museum Center CEO Doug McDonald will retire January 15. He's led the museum since 1999.

McDonald says he'll stay on as a consultant to the Union Terminal restoration project that was just approved by voters in November. The Cultural Facilities Task Force says McDonald's retirement will not affect the project

During his tenure McDonald helped to pull the museum out of debt and to grow its endowment to more than $50 million.

He also oversaw the merger with The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

Cincinnati and WWII

Dec 8, 2014

  Sunday marked the 73rd anniversary of the attack on Peal Harbor, which brought America into World War II.

Enno Meyer / Cincinnati Museum Center

In the late 1800's Cincinnatians loved Indians and Indians loved Cincinnati.

Wild West shows at the end of the 19th century were big because the frontier had disappeared and people were enamored with all things Indian. So when a Wild West show in Bellevue, Kentucky closed up, and Cree Indians from Montana were stranded, the Cincinnati Zoo came to the rescue, as far as the Native Americans were concerned.

Mummies of the World are coming to Cincinnati

Nov 21, 2014

The next major exhibit at the Cincinnati Museum Center is Mummies of the World, the largest exhibition of real mummies and related artifacts ever assembled, showcasing a collection of naturally and intentionally preserved mummies. Joining Jane Durrell with a preview of this unique exhibition is the Museum Center’s Cody Hefner.

Cincinnati Museum Center

When one of the Cincinnati Zoo's Sumatran rhinos died last year, his remains were given to the Museum Center. Friday the Museum Center is unveiling a mounted display of "Ipuh."

Ipuh came to the Cincinnati Zoo in 1991 as part of a captive breeding program between the United States and Indonesia. He was one of the last Sumatran rhinos taken from the wild and was believed to be around 33 years old when he died.

Pages