Cincinnati Mayor

Cincinnati Bar Association

Eugene Ruehlmann, who was mayor of Cincinnati in the late 1960s and early 1970s, died Saturday night at the age of 88.

Mr. Ruehlmann, a lawyer who was first elected to council in 1959, served through 1971. During his last four years on council, his Republican council colleagues elected him mayor; and he is credited with working to put together the deal that led to the construction of a new stadium on the riverfront and helping to bring professional football to the city.

Michael Keating

Cincinnati has a new budget, but some compromises made could play a bit part in this fall's Council and Mayor's race.  Howard Wilkinson shares his thoughts.

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory is rescinding raises he gave to several of his staff this week.

In a statement Mallory says:

“I am rescinding the raises that I gave my staff and returning all salaries to the previous levels.  Although the changes that I made in my office structure resulted in a saving of $66,000 to be used in next year’s budget, I realize that the perception has had a negative effect on the morale of other City Employees."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory's Youth Jobs Program will take place Thursday, March 28 at the Duke Energy Convention Center, but the mayor said Tuesday morning he needs more companies to get involved.

Mallory, in a press conference with city council member Yvette Simpson, said that many city departments will be offering summer jobs to young people from low-income families, but there are now about 40 non-profit and for-profit companies to set up booths at the job fair, which will run from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

On the same day, mayoral candidate John Cranley proposed a debate soon over the issue of privatizing parking meters, his opponent, Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls, proposed a series of five post-primary debates - after council has acted on the parking issue.

Cranley, a former city council member, opposes the plan - which has yet to be formally introduced in Cincinnati City Council - while Qualls is a supporter.

In decades of writing column, I don’t think I have ever started one on a personal note.
 

But with this most interesting year coming to a close, and a new one about to begin, I will, if you will indulge me.


For me, it has been quite a year.


After 29 years, six months and two days at the Cincinnati Enquirer, writing on politics and a myriad of other subjects, I took an early retirement offer from the Enquirer in April, leaving behind working on a daily basis with good friends and  opportunities to do interesting journalism too numerous to count.

This week WVXU Political Reporter Howard Wilkinson talks with Maryanne Zeleznik about the certified results of the Presidential Election in Ohio and the upcoming Cincinnati Mayor's race.

At the moment, there are only two announced candidates for Cincinnati mayor in 2013, both Democrats – Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls and former city council member John Cranley.


And they happen to be two of the most popular politicians of  Cincinnati voters in the past two decades.


The only time the two of them were on the ballot together in a Cincinnati City Council race was in 2007.
 

Provided

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls – who served as Cincinnati’s mayor in the 1990s – formally launched her campaign to return to the mayor’s office with an event Thursday morning in Walnut Hills that drew dozens of supporters.


One of those supporters was the present mayor, Mark Mallory, who will be term-limited out of office in 2013. Mallory appointed Qualls as vice mayor; and made her chair of Cincinnati City Council’s most influential committee, the Budget and Finance Committee.
 

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls - who was Cincinnati's mayor in the 1990s - will formally announce her candidacy in the 2013 mayoral race Thursday morning in Walnut Hills.

The current mayor, Mark Mallory, who is term-limited out in 2013, will accompany Qualls at a gathering at a pottery factory on Gilbert Avenue in Walnut Hills.

Mallory's 2009 campaign manager, Jens Sutmoller, will run Qualls' 2013 bid for the mayor's office.

One other candidate, also a Democrat, has announced his candidacy for mayor - former council member John Cranley.

Photo by Michael Keating

Cincinnati Council Member P.G. Sittenfeld is not going to run for Mayor next year.  Sittenfeld said this morning he'll seek another term on Council during the 2013 election.  

He said many friends and community leaders encouraged him to consider the Mayor's race.

"I enjoy the work on Council and I do feel good about the impact I'm having there," Sittenfeld said.  "And frankly I want to continue a lot of the priorities I've started."

The Hamilton County Board of Elections isn’t finished counting the votes from the Nov. 6 election; but it was only a matter of time before the 2013 race for Cincinnati mayor began.


John Cranley, the former Democratic city councilman and two-time congressional candidate, settled that hash this week when he announced he will be a candidate for mayor, issuing a press release and holding a flurry of media interviews.


Clearly, the 38-year-old Cranley, who has been out of office for nearly four years now, saw the value of being the first horse out of the gate.

Provided

John Cranley, the 38-year-old Democrat elected to four terms on Cincinnati City Council from 2001 through 2007, has become the first announced candidate for Cincinnati mayor in the 2013 election.

The present mayor, Mark Mallory, can't run again because of the city's term limits law, which limits the mayor to two four-year terms.

With the presidential election over, you might think politicians would get a bit of a break, but that's not the case. WVXU Political Reporter Howard Wilkinson joins Maryanne Zeleznik to talk about the next election on many people's minds. Goo

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