Cincinnati history

National Archives and Records Administration

 

Seventy-five years ago today, Japanese forces attacked the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Arcadia Publishing

Pete Rose has a downtown street named after him, but there are many once-famous Cincinnatians who have been all but forgotten. For example, our city is home to the first black Olympic champion, the artist who created the comic strip and the inventor of the Magic 8 Ball. Cincinnati Enquirer librarian and history writer Jeff Suess uncovers details about these individuals, as well as some of the many forgotten events that took place here, in his book, “Hidden History of Cincinnati” – which goes back to a time before Cincinnati was even Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati’s Harriet Beecher Stowe House is now hosting the exhibit Rethinking Porkopolis, examining our city’s long history with pigs and pork processing. 

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There is a reason Cincinnati has adopted the flying pig as its unofficial mascot. It's a  reminder of the city's early days, when the pork processing industry was so vital to the city's local life and economy Cincinnati was known as Porkopolis. 

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Preparations are underway for next year’'s 150th anniversary of the Roebling Suspension Bridge that connects Cincinnati and Covington.

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A hundred years ago, the residents of Cincinnati voted to begin work on a subway system to ease downtown traffic. But after 6 miles of infrastructure and 2.2 miles of underground tunnels were completed, the project came to a halt.

This interview originally aired May 8, 2015.

The new book, Walking Cincinnati, by Danny Korman and Katie Meyer, is a guide through the historical, architectural, and culinary sites in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The book focuses on the human-interest stories connected with the places noted along the book’s 32 walking tours, and unveils some of the more fascinating aspects of Greater Cincinnati. 

Provided, History in Your Own Backyard

  From county courthouses to country stores, ghost towns to lost bridges, the Anderson Ferry to the Great Miami Railroad Bridge, Satolli Glassmeyer and his team are preserving the memories of the Tri-state through their project, History in Your Own Backyard. Their goal is to build a database of documentary videos featuring historic buildings, bridges, tunnels, and communities, throughout Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana. 

Wikipedia

Full disclosure here: If I still worked at the Enquirer, I’d be writing about Lee Hay and her latest effort to celebrate Cincinnati’s rich broadcasting and recording history.

Up next for Hay: Another five-week series about Cincinnati’s iconic King Records, to celebrate King Records month.

On “The Blues with Lee Hay” at 11 p.m. Saturday on WVXU-FM and WMUB-FM, she interviews music historian Brian Powers and Steve Halper, nephew of King Records founder Syd Nathan, about the history of the record label and the many musicians who recorded there.

Powers also talks about the many activities scheduled to honor King Records during the September celebration around the city. (See list here.)

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Officers have been on and off horseback for years in Cincinnati. The Cincinnati Police mounted patrol was disbanded in 2013 because of budget cuts. But after concert goers got out of control on Fountain Square this year during Fourth of July weekend, calls to bring the patrol back grew louder.

Today when Greater Cincinnati movie-goers want to catch a feature film they can head to one of the local multiplexes, a smaller art-house theater or even an IMAX. Or they can just stream a movie to their flat-screen TV or smart device. But there was a time when seeing a movie in Cincinnati meant a trip to the Albee, the Shubert, or one of the other dozen-plus theaters downtown, or to one of the suburban movie houses like the Covedale, the Mount Lookout Cinema, or the 20th Century in Oakley.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Rearranging historical artifacts is nothing new at the Cincinnati Museum Center.  Temporary exhibits come and go.  But rarely is the move a big production as it was Tuesday morning.

Three employees of a rigging company set up a trestle overhead as they prepared to move 3,500 pounds of iron in the form of a 150-year-old cannon.  They placed blankets around the barrel; and connected straps to a chain pulley system.  They were as careful as they could be.

  The Society of Friends, more commonly known as the Quakers, came to Ohio in the late 1700s and early 1800s. The Quakers played a major role in nineteenth-century reform efforts including the temperance, women's rights, and abolition movements.

Provided, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

  Serving with Honor: The Queen City’'s Veterans, an exhibit now at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County and running through mid-January, profiles some of the many veterans from the Greater Cincinnati area who took up the call of duty, starting from the War of 1812 to the present day. Photos, diaries, letters, uniforms, medals and other artifacts from local veterans will be on display.

World War II transformed Cincinnati from a relatively important but parochial midwestern city into a teeming bastion of military might.

While thousands served in the nation's armed forces, others contributed to rationing programs, salvage drives, blackouts and war bond rallies. Scores of community-based programs blossomed as Cincinnatians on the home front threw themselves wholeheartedly into the "total war" that Washington believed necessary for victory.

After answering the call to treat domestic duty as seriously as any battleground assignment, the Queen City emerged from the war as utterly changed as the nation itself. Author Robert Miller brings to life this dramatic, patriotic period in Cincinnati's history with his book World War II Cincinnati: From the Front Lines to the Home Front.

The Cincinnati Museum Center has a photographic stroll through our city’s history with their current exhibit Treasures in Black & White: Historic Photographs of Cincinnati. Scott Gampfer, director of the History Collection & Library at the Museum Center, tells Jane Durrell that the exhibit spans 100 years of our history, from 1860-1960 and will run until late October.

Provided, Gray & Pape

  

Provided, Clerisy Press

Local award-winning freelance writer and editor Wendy Hart Beckman joins us to discuss her latest book, Founders and Famous Families Cincinnati, a Who's Who, and a When and Where, of Cincinnati's origins. John Cleves Symmes, President Benjamin Harrison, Nicholas Longworth, Founders tells their stories and more, including details about our city’s many firsts, from the first professional baseball team to the first concrete skyscraper. On Wednesday, May 28 as part of the Cincinnati Museum Center's Insights Lecture Series, Ms. Beckman will be presenting: A Glass of Wine, a Loaf of Bread and Wow!: Nicholas Longworth’s Many Contributions to Cincinnati. For more information, click here.

Provided, Bockfest

  Bockfest, that celebration of Cincinnati’s brewing tradition, Over-the Rhine, and spring, which we all need so desperately right now, starts Friday.

Arcadia Publishing

With dozens of local breweries in operation, Cincinnati was once known as the beer capital of the world. But by the mid-Seventies, only two local breweries remained. Now, thanks to a growing list of craft beer makers and a renewed appreciation of the city’s rich brewing history, Cincinnati is once again becoming known for its beer.

Arcadia Publishing

Cincinnati has a tradition of producing winners in the boxing ring, Tim Austin,  Freddie Miller, Aaron Pryor, and most famous, Ezzard Charles, “The Cincinnati Cobra,” who defeated Joe Louis in 1950 to become the Heavyweight Champion of the World.

Jane Durrell has a review of a fascinating book about the engraving and print trade in 18th century Cincinnati, The Engraving Trade in Early Cincinnati: With a Brief Account of the Beginning of the Lithographic Trade, by author Donald C. O’Brien.