Cincinnati Health Department

Provided / Cincinnati State

Update 5:38 p.m.: Cincinnati State says Provost Monica Posey will serve as interim president.

The local infant mortality rate is still unacceptably high, but more babies are surviving to their first birthday in Cincinnati than in previous years. The Cincinnati Health Department is working to continue that trend, sponsoring a series of discussions for would-be, expectant and young mothers, and fathers, about family planning, healthy moms and babies. 

The Cincinnati Health Department like many medical facilities across the nation is closely monitoring the Ebola outbreak.  

Director for Public Health Preparedness Dr. Steven Englender addressed a city council committee Tuesday.  He said they want to make sure, in the rare situation of a local Ebola the case, the patient is not sent home from a hospital as was the case in Dallas.


Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley said his decision to replace the chairwoman of the Cincinnati Board of Health has nothing to do with politics.  

Cranley said Tuesday in a phone interview he was appointing Herschel Chalk to replace Joyce Kinley, whose term expired on March 1st.  

“Herschel Chalk, who I’m appointing, has been a long-time advocate against prostate cancer, who's somebody I’ve gotten to know,” Cranley said.  “I was impressed by him because of his advocacy on behalf of fighting cancer.  I committed to appoint him a long time ago.”

The chairwoman of Cincinnati's Board of Health is not being re-appointed to the board.  Joyce Kinley told Council's Budget and Finance Committee Monday Mayor John Cranley told her of his decision on February 24th.  

Council Member Chris Seelbach and Kinley had this exchange during the meeting.

  • Seelbach:  Did the Mayor give you any explanation?
  • Kinley:  He told me that he had to fulfill a campaign promise, and that's why he had to remove me.

Seelbach said he is concerned about putting politics above what is best for the city.  

A usually routine matter of letting the Cincinnati Health Department apply for a federal grant will likely be anything but routine this time.  

The agency wants to use the money to open two more health clinics in the city.  Right now it has five.  

Mayor John Cranley and some council members are concerned about the budget impact that will have on the city.  

  The Center for Closing the Health Gap recently launched a campaign to raise awareness of inequalities throughout our region that cause vulnerable populations in Cincinnati to have poorer health and shorter life expectancies. Closing the Health Gap Founder and President Dwight Tillery  and Executive Director Renee Mahaffey Harris talk about the campaign and initiatives to eliminate health inequalities in greater Cincinnati.

Provided, Cincinnati Health Department

The results of a life expectancy study recently conducted by the Cincinnati Health Department show as much as a 20 year difference in longevity among the city’s 47 neighborhood groupings. Cincinnati Health Department Commissioner Dr. Noble Maseru and Assistant Health Commissioner Dr. Camille Jones discuss the study, and what can be done to address health inequalities in our community.