Cincinnati Edition

Liza Long is the mother of a child who has bipolar disorder. When she heard about the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, her first thought was, “"what if my son does that someday?"” She wrote an emotional response to the tragedy, which was published online as “I Am Adam Lanza'’s Mother

  We learned yesterday that Kroger has acquired the majority of Cincinnati-based DunnhumbyUSA, the data analysis company that provides it with customer information. 

  Two more movies are ready to start filming in Greater Cincinnati. Over the years, several movie crews have shot films in and around our region, giving locals plenty of opportunities to get a taste of Hollywood and grab a few seconds of fame on film as extras. But how do casting directors decide who to put in a movie?

According to the U.S. Census Bureau’'s 2012 American Community Survey, the City of Cincinnati has the second highest child poverty rate in the nation, with 53.1% of children living below the poverty line. And people all across our region are facing hard economic times, 18% of the Cincinnati tristate population now lives in poverty. WCPO recently launched a year-long series to explore childhood poverty in our region: the causes, efforts to reduce poverty rates and what day-to-day life is like for those in need.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A start-up company seeking money from The Brandery in Cincinnati is looking to cash in on the increasing popularity of medical tourism. Medko Health is a finalist in the latest round of Brandery funding.

  Today there are more than 120,000 people waiting for a life-saving organ transplant.

  We continue our look at organ donations in the United States, as we discuss the growing use of tissue and cornea transplants. More than 47,000 corneas were transplanted in 2013, and more than 1 million tissue transplants are done each year.

The home mortgage crisis and Great Recession created a shift in consumer spending, behavior, and attitudes. Joining us to take a look at just how dramatic that shift was, along with current consumer spending habits and the affect they have on future economic growth, are  Dr. LaVaughn Henry, vice president and senior regional officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland; and, Jack Kleinhenz, chief economist for the National Retail Federation.

Many have loved reading the book, others painfully slogged their way through it, and some of us just saw the movie. It’'s been called “the American Bible,” Herman Mellville'’s Moby-Dick, and it comes alive this weekend with the Moby-Dick Art Fest. The four days of events kick-off this evening, and include a symposium, panel discussion, a marathon reading of the novel, and an exhibition of artworks inspired by Moby-Dick, created by Northern Kentucky University students over the past two decades.

The Supreme Court will hear arguments next week in a landmark case on gay marriage, with same-sex couples challenging bans in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan, and Tennessee. Joining us to discuss the legal path same-sex marriage has traveled so far in the United States, and what the process of arguing before the Supreme Court involves, are UC College of Law Judge Joseph P. Kinneary Professor of Law, Verna Williams; Kennith Katkin, professor of law at the NKU Chase College of Law; and, WVXU reporter Ann Thompson.

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