Cincinnati Edition

WVXU - Mark Heyne

It may be hard for some to imagine, but winter must be officially over, because Cincinnati’'s unofficial holiday, Opening Day, is finally here, as the Reds welcome the Pirates to Great American Ballpark Monday for their first game of the season. Greg Rhodes, Cincinnati Reds team historian; sports writer John Erardi; and, WVXU'’s Howard Wilkinson join us to size up this year’'s Reds, and take a look at the Findlay Market Parade and other opening day celebrations.

In a sports writing career covering half a century, Hal McCoy crowns his own Hall of Fame career with his latest book, “The Real McCoy: My Half Century with the Cincinnati Reds.” The memoir of the team gives fans an inside-the-dugout look that never made the daily press. Veteran sports writer Hal McCoy and WVXU political reporter and avid baseball fan Howard Wilkinson join us to discuss the book, Hal McCoy'’s years covering the Reds, and what really happened to Sparky.

  Human trafficking is a multi-billion dollar a year industry that forces the most vulnerable in our society, including millions of children, into modern-day slavery for labor or for sex. And it exists here in Greater Cincinnati. Joining us to look at the problem in our region, and what legal and social actions and programs are being used to combat it, are Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine; Erin Meyer, coalition manager for the anti-human trafficking coalition End Slavery Cincinnati; Julie Wilson, chief assistant prosecutor and public information officer with the Hamilton County Prosecutor’'s Office; and Cincinnati Union Bethel Executive Vice President and director of the agency’'s Off the Streets program, Mary Carol Melton.

  Michael Bean has, literally and figuratively, written the book on wildlife conservation law and has directed the wildlife conservation activities of the Environmental Defense Fund since 1977. 

  As the stock markets continue their wild swings, some financial experts are calling the volatility we’'ve experienced during the last several months the “new norm” for 2015, which is not welcome news to the average investor. Joining us to look at the current markets and discuss smart ways to invest your money for the long haul are Crit Thomas, senior investment strategist with Touchstone Funds; and, local financial advisor Chris DeSimio.

  Miguel “"Mike"” Benito Fernandez has made two long journeys in his life. The first came when he and his family were exiled from Cuba in 1964 with no warning and no money. They soon made New York City their home and faced a new path of challenges, opportunities and lessons. His second journey came in 2013 when Fernandez made the 508-mile pilgrimage along El Camino de Santiago from France through Spain to raise money for the Miami Children’'s Hospital. He tells his story in a new book, “Humbled by the Journey: Life Lessons for My Family and Yours.” Today, Fernandez is a successful businessman and philanthropist who believes in the power of giving back to others. He talks with us about his life’'s journeys.

  Thanks to high-definition cameras, monitors and advances in communications technology, and driven by a growing shortage of physicians, telehealth is quickly growing in use and popularity. It allows a patient to consult with a healthcare provider remotely instead of traveling to an office or clinic, and the costs involved are usually much less than a traditional office visit. Joining us to look at how telehealth is helping to change the practice of medicine are Dr. Debi Sampsel, chief officer of innovation and entrepreneurship at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing; Pam Kimmel, director of telehealth for UC Health; and, Megan Gresham, director of corporate communications with Maple Knoll Village.

  Richard Green worked at The Cincinnati Enquirer for 16 years starting in 1988, before moving on to management positions with Gannett in Palm Springs and De Moines. And now he’s back. Earlier this month, Rick Green took over as president and publisher of The Enquirer. He joins us to discuss returning to the city'’s only remaining daily newspaper, and how The Enquirer is changing and evolving to compete in a 24-7 digital news environment.

  According to the Association for College Admission Counseling, the average U.S. school has one guidance counselor for every 500 students. In many poorer school districts, where arguably the need is much greater, the ratio is even worse. Northern Kentucky University recently hosted the annual National Evidence-Based School Counseling Conference, where experts explored the best methods and practices to positively impact student achievement.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Angelina Jolie made the difficult choice of having her breasts, ovaries and fallopian tubes removed because genetic tests showed, without the elective surgery, she had an 87 percent chance of getting breast cancer and a 50 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer.

Jolie's mother died at 56 years old. She also lost her grandmother and aunt to cancer. In a New York Times op-ed the filmmaker and actress explained why she made that decision.

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