Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

With increasing concerns about concussions, are pediatricians ordering too many CT scans? Some local researchers think the answer may be yes.

Cincinnati Children's emergency medicine physician Dr. Wendy Pomerantz and her team surveyed how pediatricians would treat various brain injury situations. She used three scenarios.

It's still five years away from human clinical trials, but at least in mice, a new antibody injection has seemingly suppressed allergic reactions to food.

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

Cincinnati Children's Hospital is putting visitor restrictions in place because of the high number of patients in the hospital with respiratory illnesses. 

A release says all visitors should be healthy – free from fever, cough, colds, or stomach virus symptoms. Children under 14 may only visit siblings and only parents or guardians should visit in critical care areas.  The restrictions are the same as those put in place every winter during flu season.

Kathy Scoffield

Almost four years after an Arizona boy swallowed a button battery that burned his esophagus and trachea, doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital, will rebuild his throat so he can eventually breathe without the help of a trach tube and learn to speak more clearly.

  Dyslexia is a lifelong condition that affects how the brain works, making it difficult to identify speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words. Dyslexia often runs in families, and according to the National Institutes of Health, it affects 15% of the population. Joining us to look at dyslexia and what treatment methods are successful in helping those with the condition learn how to process information are Dr.

A pilot collaboration between Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the Freestore Foodbank is making a difference for under-nourished babies in its first two-years, as reported in the online journal Pediatrics.

The problem:

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center emphasizes it's not for everyone, but a few families are taking advantage of a new way to remember their critically ill children.

Music therapist Brian Schreck  records the child's heartbeat and uses it as a metronome or drumbeat while he mixes it with songs that are important to the patient or the family.

  Computer-generated virtual environments have been commonly used in training programs for first responders, pilots, and members of the military. But they also have a wide variety of other potential uses, from industry to medicine. Joining us to discuss the educational and practical applications of virtual environments, 3D modeling and virtual reality software are Chris Collins, project manager at the University of Cincinnati Center for Simulations & Virtual Environments Research; Dr. Michael Richardson, associate professor at the UC Center for Cognition, Action, and Perception;  and Dr. Adam Kiefer, TEAM VR Laboratory director at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center’'s Division of Sports Medicine.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

With the opening of The NICU Family Support Program at UC Medical Center, The March of Dimes, UC and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have another element in their multi-pronged approach of studying and helping parents deal with preterm labor.