Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

High-Tech Shark Tank

May 11, 2015
Ann Thompson / WVXU

As part of the University of Cincinnati's Research Week, a friendly little "Shark Tank" competition brought out the brilliant and innovative scientists from UC and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

  Most of us can'’t imagine ever harming a child, especially one of our own children, but as recent high-profile cases here in Cincinnati show, child abuse continues to be a tragic and ongoing problem. And from brutal physical attacks to neglect, the abuse can take many forms. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, in 2012 nationally more than 680,000 children were considered abused or neglected, and an estimated 1,640 kids died as a result.

Local artist Susan Byrnes, a recent recipient of a Cincinnati Art Ambassador Fellowship, has teamed with researchers from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to combine art and science in her exhibit, Discover. She talks with our Jane Durrell about being an Art Ambassador, this collaboration, and the exhibit, currently on display at C-Link Gallery at the Brazee Street Studios.

Provided / Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

One in nine babies in the United States is born premature. That's according to 2012 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Cincinnati Children's Hospital researchers think they may have found a way to help prevent pregnancy complications like stillbirth or prematurity.

In a somewhat counter-intuitive step, doctors theorize that blocking, or refocusing, a woman's immune cells could be the answer.

Our Barbara Gray steps away from her regular book beat to introduce listeners to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center’s Family Pet Center, located at the Mt. Auburn facility, and one of only two such programs in the US. Kate Shamszad, Critical Manager for the Division of Child Life and Integrative Care at Children’s explains the benefits of this space where kids and their pets can spend time during a hospitalization.

Cincinnati Children's

In what's being called a "major advancement," Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and other researchers around the country say young sickle cell anemia patients have a safer way to manage their disease.

Russell Ware, MD PhD,director of Hematology at Cincinnati Children's says the standard of care is lifetime blood transfusions for those at risk of stroke. But a clinical trial shows the medicine hydroxyurea  is just as good as blood transfusions without the cost and side effects.

  

  

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

After appearing in a wheel chair last week, Lauren Hill stood on her own Tuesday before a crowd of students at Mount Saint Joseph University. She came to thank them for turning out for her first collegiate basketball game and raising funds for The Cure Starts Now Foundation.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Flanked by her parents, Lauren Hill looked at the crowd of doctors and researchers working to find new treatments for her rare form of cancer, and smiled.

"Just keep working hard and never give up," she said. "I don't expect any of you guys to give up."

Mount St. Joesph University basketball player Lauren Hill's "Layup 4 Lauren" campaign to raise money for pediatric cancer research went viral. On Thursday, Hill handed over a check to Cincinnati Children's Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute's DIPG registry.

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