Cincinnati budget

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati City Council will vote Wednesday on three ordinances needed to allow a plan to build a new Kroger store in Downtown to move forward.

The Budget and Finance Committee met Monday and approved the measures.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley has used his veto power to fix what a council ordinance he believes would have resulted in a structurally unbalanced city budget.

On Wednesday, council voted 5-4 to reject a plan from City Manager Harry Black to boot cars with three or more unpaid parking tickets, a move that would have generated $600,000 for the city.

In Black's proposal, that money would be replaced with a $600,000 withdrawal from the urban development fund.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council has given final approval to the city budget totaling nearly $1.6 billion for the fiscal year, which begins on July 1.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council will continue work Wednesday morning on finalizing changes to the city's next two-year budget. The full council could approve the spending plan that afternoon.

As it stands right now, there is a $600,000 gap that must be closed after a council majority told city administrators not to move forward with a plan to contract with a company to "boot" vehicles that have three or more unpaid parking tickets.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council Members are still expected to take final votes on the city budget next week.  

They're supposed to submit their proposed changes by noon Friday.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

It is now up to Cincinnati City Council to debate and decide what to include in the city's next two-year budget for the new fiscal year which begins on July 1.

City Council will use City Manager Harry Black's budget proposal, and the changes made to it by John Cranley, as a framework.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati residents have a final chance Wednesday evening to offer comments on the city's next two-year budget.

Once again attendance was light for a session Monday night at the Dunham Recreation Center in West Price Hill. Only 10 speakers offered comments on the spending plan.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Attendance was light for City Council's first public hearing on the budget for the next two years.

About two dozen people attended the session at the Mt. Washington Recreation Center. Only 11 people offered comments on the spending proposal.

Bill Rinehart/WVXU

Privatizing the City of Cincinnati's parking system was a key issue when John Cranley was running for mayor in 2013. He opposed the idea, and the plan to privatize eventually fell through. But parking in the city, and how much money the system should generate, is still a contentious issue.

John Cranley
Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley rolled out his version of the $1.6 billion all-funds city budget Thursday afternoon, one in which he restored about $3 million in cuts that were in the budget proposal of City Manager Harry Black.

It is, Cranley said, a structurally balanced budget that plugs a $26 million deficit for this year.

Cincinnati city council members made it clear Monday that they don't much care for City Manager Harry Black's idea of plugging part of a budget hole with a parking ticket increase.

Black's proposed budget would increase parking tickets from $45 to $60.

City of Cincinnati

Frugal but structurally balanced. That's how Cincinnati's City Manager is describing his proposed 2018-2019 budget.

City of Cincinnati

At least three Cincinnati Council members want to revisit the city's living wage ordinance to increase the hourly pay rate for part-time city employees to at least $15 per hour.

The issue was raised Monday during a budget and finance committee meeting.  The members were being asked to approve a labor agreement for a group of part-time, seasonal workers.  

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black announced Wednesday the projected general fund budget deficit for the next fiscal year has ballooned to $25.1 million.

Earlier this year it was projected to be between $7 and $9 million.

City of Cincinnati

So far Cincinnati is not hitting the revenue projections needed to meet this year's city budget.  

Those revenues were about $2 million less than what was forecast through the end of December. Plus, income tax collections are $4.3 million below what was forecast for the fiscal year.

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