cicadas

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Anaiah Brooks is a sixth grader at John P. Parker school in Madisonville. She wants to be a baker when she grows up. She already knows chemistry is a big part of baking. And so Anaiah is big into science.

Gene Kritsky / Provided

The Cincinnati area now has a new sustaining brood of cicadas. In May 2017, insects associated with the Great Eastern Brood came out of the ground four years early.

Frank Hadley Collins

This could be a good year for some bugs and not so good for humans. Gene Kritsky is dean of Mount Saint Joe's behavioral and natural sciences department and says the lack of snow and consistently cold weather this winter will help some insects. He says that weather pattern, repeated over several years, will have a noticeable effect.

Provided: Gene Kritsky

Entomologists are expecting a small emergence of cicadas in the Cincinnati area this year. Most of the insects from Brood X, the Great Eastern Brood, aren't due until 2021, but Gene Kritsky says climate change has accelerated the life cycle.

Gene Kritsky / Provided

Ohio's only 13-year cicadas, which were creating lots of buzz a few weeks ago in parts of Brown and Clermont Counties, are now fading fast. The adults will be gone by the end of June and their offspring will be falling from trees and by Christmas will be 8-12" below ground, according to entomologist Dr. Gene Kritsky of the College of Mt. St. Joseph and his website.