Chris Seelbach

There are competing proposals for offering parental leave to Cincinnati city workers.  

Council Members Yvette Simpson and Chris Seelbach want to offer four weeks of paid leave after the birth or adoption of a child.  

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati Council member Chris Seelbach says he won’t vote to override Mayor John Cranley’s veto of a proposed charter amendment that would allow city council to meet behind closed doors to discuss some issues.

Cincinnati like the rest of the nation will pause Tuesday to honor veterans who have served in various wars.  

Currently these returning soldiers are having a difficult time finding jobs.  The veteran unemployment rate tends to be higher than the national average.  

Cincinnati Council Member Chris Seelbach is announcing an effort Monday afternoon to change that.  

The city will begin tracking how many veterans are part of city contracts.

City of Cincinnati

A Cincinnati council member is heading back to school. Chris Seelbach will spend the council's summer recess attending the Harvard Kennedy School “Senior Executives in State & Local Government” program as a Bohnett Fellow.

In a release Seelbach says, "I am deeply honored to accept the Bohnett Fellowship to attend Harvard Kennedy School this summer. I’m looking forward to getting back to the classroom in order to further hone my skills as both a legislature and leader."

Taft Stettinius & Hollister website

Two Cincinnati Council Members are complaining about this week's demotion of John Curp from city solicitor to chief counsel for MSD and the Water Works. 

P.G. Sittenfeld and Chris Seelbach questioned Interim City Manager Scott Stiles about the personnel move he announced Tuesday in a memo.  Seelbach said he thinks Stiles made his decision based on the wishes of Mayor John Cranley or perhaps some council members.

"To me it just seems incredibly fishy, incredibly political and incredibly wrong and against our city charter," Seelbach said.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati Council will not vote Wednesday to confirm Willie Carden as the next city manager.

Mayor John Cranley announced the delay Tuesday just before Council's Rules Committee was scheduled to interview Carden and take a vote.

Cranley said he was delaying the vote because he did not realize some council members had not seen an ordinance that will exempt Carden from living in the city.

"To make sure that Council has time to digest the ordinances," Cranley said. "And that all of you have the opportunity to meet with Mr. Carden individually before taking a vote."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Could a Metropolitan Sewer District stalemate between Cincinnati and Hamilton County be coming to an end?

The sides have been at odds over city-enacted hiring policies. The county specifically doesn't like a responsible bidder provision requiring contractors to graduate apprentices (at least one per year for five years).

Councilman Chris Seelbach is proposing a solution he thinks the county will like. He says he's willing to throw out the apprentice graduation requirement in favor of an incentive program.

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati Council could vote on an ordinance next week that's designed to reduce cell phone theft.  

Right now someone could take your mobile device and get cash for it in just about 10 minutes at so called pop-up cell phone stores.  

Council Member Chris Seelbach said the new law will require these businesses to be licensed just like pawn shops.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials continue to hash out a compromise on several hiring and bidding policies related to the Metropolitan Sewer District.

An August 1 deadline has come and gone, meaning a city moratorium on the policies has expired. That led County Commissioners Wednesday to halt the bidding process for an upcoming project.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Hamilton County Commissioners are expected to vote Wednesday morning on re-opening the bidding process on some Metropolitan Sewer District projects.

The board initiated the moratorium to force renewed talks between the county and the city, which runs the sewer district. At issue are several city initiated hiring policies and practices the county dislikes, and in some cases says are illegal.

The county is re-opening the bid process following a city council vote two weeks ago to suspend the hiring policies until August.