Chris DeSimio

Earlier this month, the New York Stock Exchange suspended trading in its main market for 3½ hours due to a technical issue. The shutdown jarred investors, but it did not have the impact it would have had 20 years ago.

Wall Street still seems to be bullish on the markets, but historically the summer months have not been kind to stocks. The Dow Jones industrial average posted slight losses in June and August, and slight gains in July, on average over the last 20 years. Many analysts are at odds over what this summer will bring for the markets.

Last week'’s strong jobs report has Wall Street analysts predicting the Federal Reserve will soon raise short-term interest rates.

The earliest financial advice most of us get, right along with saving money, is to try and establish good credit. But that involves a great deal more than using credit cards to make your purchases. And sadly, many people are not able to manage their credit properly and can fall deeply into debt.

    

Graduation ceremonies are being held all across the country, with new graduates about to either continue their education or enter jobs and begin their working lives. But while they may have diplomas or degrees in-hand, many of them won'’t have the financial knowledge they will need to successfully navigate the world of credit, cash and debt.

Those who have paid into the Social Security system during their working years have several decisions to make about their retirement. An individual can begin collecting benefits as early as age 62 or as late as age 70, but when you start collecting benefits will affect the amount of money you get. And there are other things to take into consideration, including spousal benefits, that could dramatically change the total amount you receive in benefits.

According to the 2012 census report, a record 36% of all millennial-aged adults lived with their parents. Due to the economic downturn, slow job market, and high college loan debt, adult children are staying at home longer or returning to live with their parents. 

  As the stock markets continue their wild swings, some financial experts are calling the volatility we’'ve experienced during the last several months the “new norm” for 2015, which is not welcome news to the average investor. Joining us to look at the current markets and discuss smart ways to invest your money for the long haul are Crit Thomas, senior investment strategist with Touchstone Funds; and, local financial advisor Chris DeSimio.

Over the last week the stock market has been a rollercoaster ride, with the Dow Jones Average gaining or dropping hundreds of points from one session to the next. Joining us to look at the recent market volatility and discuss ways to invest your money for growth are Michael Schroer, managing partner and chief investment officer with Renaissance Investment Management; and local financial advisor Chris DeSimio.

Millennials, those aged 18 to 35, are terrible at saving money for retirement. That age group is the only one with a negative savings rate. 

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