children's health

School-age children, from preschoolers to college students, need vaccines. While it's true that some vaccine-preventable diseases have become very rare thanks to vaccines, the United States experienced a record number of measles cases last year, and approximately 9,000 cases of whooping cough have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control already in 2015.

Angie Lipscomb Photography

While the local infant mortality rate is still unacceptably high, far higher than the national rate, there have been recent signs of significant improvement. More babies are surviving to their first birthday in Cincinnati than in previous years, a milestone acknowledged earlier this summer at the Cincinnati Health Department’s Infant Vitality Forum. 

 An audit from the Kentucky Immunization Project found most of the children seen at the four health centers of the Northern Kentucky Health Department had received all of the recommended vaccinations. 

95 percent of the children coming through the centers had received all of the recommended immunizations.  District Health Director Dr. Lynne Saddler says most of the remaining five percent received their shots from other providers.

The Dragonfly Foundation based here in Cincinnati helps families of children with significant health issues while they’re being treated and also during their recovery process.