Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Flanked by her parents, Lauren Hill looked at the crowd of doctors and researchers working to find new treatments for her rare form of cancer, and smiled.

"Just keep working hard and never give up," she said. "I don't expect any of you guys to give up."

Mount St. Joesph University basketball player Lauren Hill's "Layup 4 Lauren" campaign to raise money for pediatric cancer research went viral. On Thursday, Hill handed over a check to Cincinnati Children's Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute's DIPG registry.

Devon Still and Cincinnati Children's

Maybe you have joined the Saint's Sean Peyton and the Eagles' Chip Kelly in buying a $100 Devon Still jersey to support pediatric cancer research at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Thursday, at the game, the Cincinnati Bengals will present a check from the jersey sales to the hospital for $1 million. Still's 4-year old daughter Leah is planning to see the presentation in person. She's well enough to travel.

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is getting high praise.  It ranks third overall in the U.S. News and World Report's 2013 Best Children's Hospitals ranking.  And for the first time, Cincinnati Children's was ranked number one for pediatric cancer care. 

Rosie Carson back to host concert event

Apr 12, 2013

For the second year, Cincinnati musician Rosie Carson, who has been touring internationally of late, will come home to host and perform at a fundraiser dedicated to her mother, Sue Carson. Sue lost her battle with cancer, so proceeds from the event, which also features The Graveblankets and Tickled Pink, will benefit Cincinnati’s Cancer Family Care, which provides education and counseling to cancer patients and their families. The concert happens Tuesday, April 16 at the 20th Century Theater. Rosie joins Frank Johnson to talk about this event, her recent travels, and the new CD she and partner Kevin Dempsey will have out in October.

There are currently over 115,000 men, women and children in the United States who are waiting for some type of organ transplant. Many wait years for a compatible donor.

Join us Thursday morning April 4 at 9:20 as we discuss what it’s like to be in need of an organ transplant, and to be an organ donor. Impact Cincinnati, on 91-7, WVXU. You can send your questions or comments to We’re also on Facebook and Twitter. Impact Cincinnati, on 91.7, WVXU.

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute are studying whether a widely used cholesterol-reducing drug can help prevent the recurrence of colorectal cancer.

The multi-year study is currently looking for participants.

Ann Thompson WVXU

The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation says the U.S. is becoming more successful in treating some kinds of cancer, including brain, colorectal, stomach and breast cancer. This is due in part to more aggressive care. The University of Cincinnati is pledging more aggressive and personalized care with a new team of doctors and a new center. WVXU's Ann Thompson reports what makes the new bone marrow transplant center and its doctors different, in Focus on Technology.

In this week’s Focus on Technology, Ann Thompson reports there’s a new way to study one of the most deadly forms of cancer.

As Breast Cancer Awareness Month comes to a close, Mark Perzel has a conversation with Cincinnatian Tami Boehmer – self-described mom, wife, author, and survivor.