budget

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil is asking for a $7 million budget increase for 2017. He says the dollars are needed to cover union salary increases and back pay approved by county commissioners, begin a three-year radio replacement, and hire six corporals to help supervise new coverage areas. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black presented his first budget Wednesday to Mayor John Cranley.  

Black said the proposed budget “does not use one-time sources to balance and strategically invests in areas ripe for improvement.”

Ohio House GOP proposes budget very different from the Kasich plan

Apr 15, 2015
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Republican leaders of the Ohio House want to scrap some tax hikes proposed by Gov. John Kasich. But they also want to keep a proposed tax cut, even though it won’t be as big as he wanted.

Kasich’s proposed budget included a three quarter of a percent increase in the state’s sales tax. It would apply the sales tax to some services that are not currently taxed.

UC Economics Center

A study by UC's Economics Center is forecasting higher revenues for the City of Cincinnati. However, it also expects expenditures will increase as well, and at a faster rate.

The report expects revenues will climb to $400.2 million by the year 2020. Expenditures are predicted to reach $429.3 million that same year.

The first of several public hearings on the proposed 2015 Hamilton County general fund budget is Thursday evening.

Commissioners will hold a meeting at the Green Township Trustee building at 6:30 p.m.

The county administrator is recommending a $210.7 million spending plan that calls for a quarter cent sales tax increase.

Hamilton County Commissioners are considering the administration's proposed budget for next year.

Most notably, County administrator Christian Sigman's $210.7 million proposal calls for a quarter cent sales tax increase.

Cincinnati administrators will now begin the process of implementing the fiscal year 2015 budget.  

City council Wednesday approved the 17 ordinances needed to enact the spending plan.  The votes were 6-3 on the major changes to the budget.  
Council adopted Mayor John Cranley's proposal with about a dozen changes to it.  Cranley said it sends the right message.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati Council is expected to approve the city's operating budget Wednesday for the fiscal year which starts July 1st.  

The Budget and Finance Committee held a final public hearing on the spending plan Tuesday night.  25 people offered their comments at Midway Elementary School in Westwood.  

The majority of them spoke in favor of city funding to improve neighborhood business districts.

Jay Hanselman

Six Cincinnati Council members are ready to approve the city's operating budget for the next fiscal year which begins July 1st.  

The Budget and Finance Committee held a meeting Monday to approve a motion making a handful of changes to Mayor John Cranley's proposed spending plan that was presented to Council last month.  A final vote on the proposal is set Wednesday.

Jay Hanselman

If all goes as planned, by the middle of this week Cincinnati Council will have approved an operating budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1st.

Council's Budget and Finance Committee has special sessions set for Monday and Tuesday.  The group will be making final modifications to the spending plan Mayor John Cranley sent to Council on May 14th.  

There's a final public hearing Tuesday evening at 6 at Midway Elementary School on Glenmore Avenue.  

The full Council is scheduled to take a final vote on the budget Wednesday afternoon.  

Jay Hanselman

There was a larger turnout for Wednesday night's second public hearing on the proposed Cincinnati budget for the next fiscal year which starts July 1st.  

20 people addressed Council's Budget and Finance Committee during the session at the Oakley Community Center.  

Evanston Community Council President Anzora Adkins said she supports city funding for the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority.  She said it has done good work in her neighborhood.

Jay Hanselman

A small number of people showed up Wednesday night to speak about the proposed Cincinnati budget for the next fiscal year.  There were lots of empty chairs in the auditorium and only eight people offered testimony.

Some of them want continued funding for on road bicycle lanes.  The proposed budget could cut money for bike lane maintenance and eliminate dollars to build new ones.

Jay Hanselman

Mayor John Cranley presented a new budget Wednesday morning which closes a $22 million budget hole without lay-offs of city employees.

Cranley, in a press conference at police headquarters, said the $358 million general fund budget, if passed by city council, would be the first structurally balanced city budget in more than a decade.

“No gimmicks, no on-time revenue streams,’’ Cranley said, surrounded by several city council members and representatives of the police and fire departments and city employee union officials.

Hamilton County Commissioners approved the 2014 general fund budget Wednesday.

The $204.1 million spending plan was nearly unchanged from the plan presented by county administration. The only difference being redirecting $6.65 million in indigent care levy funds from the UC Medical Center to cover a gap in the Sheriff's inmate care budget.

The budget Hamilton County Commissioners vote on later this week will likely look a lot like the one proposed by county administration.

Board President Chris Monzel is suggesting just one change. The proposed budget calls for cutting $6.65 million in indigent care levy funds from the UC Medical Center and using it to cover a gap in the Sheriff's inmate care budget.

In his proposal, Monzel writes:

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