brain

Ann Thompson / WVXU

UC researchers have figured out a way to non-invasively peek inside the brain of a neurological intensive care patient to stop the deadliest form of stroke, an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). They say this is important because the person is often sedated, sometimes on a ventilator and cannot communicate.

Doctors Matthew Flaherty, Opeolu Adeoye, George Shaw and Joe Clark became frustrated that CT and MRI scans were the only option and couldn't be done repeatedly. Shaw tells the story.

Pixabay.com

Most of us have experienced walking into a room and then forgetting why we came in, misplacing our keys or not being able to immediately recall a friend's name. Having these so-called senior moments is fairly common, but they can be troubling. There are ways to keep your mind sharp and help prevent memory lapses.

UC Health/Mayfield Brain & Spine

University of Cincinnati researchers are looking deep inside the brain to figure out why some head injury patients recover and others do not.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Brilliant minds trapped in bodies that don't work are finding their way out with the help of an EEG brain headset like this one.

Brain caps have been around for decades but are now being refined to allow people to do more complex tasks. Take for example Rosemary Johnson who, before a devastating car accident, was a violinist with the Welsh National Opera Orchestra. Science Alert reports she is now able to compose music with a computer that can read her mind.

Mayfield Clinic

University of Cincinnati biomedical engineers, neurologists and Mayfield Clinic brain surgeons are in the process of creating a sound map for the abnormal brain.

Deep inside the head, groups of neurons make sounds. The doctors will use the sounds to figure out what the problem areas are and how to better treat abnormalities in the brain.