Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience.

As the story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive. 

A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

There is also a sequel now available: Hollow City: The Second Novel of miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children.

Drawing on ten years of research in the trenches of Cleveland libraries, boarded-up high schools, and secret, private collections, and a love of comic books, Brad Ricca's Super Boys is the first ever full biography about Superman's creators.

Among scores of new discoveries, the book reveals the first stories and pictures ever published by the two, where the first Superman story really came from, the real inspiration for Lois Lane, the template for Superman's costume, and much, much more. Super Boys also tracks the boys' unknown, often mysterious lives after they left Superman, including Siegel's secret work during World War II and never-before-seen work from Shuster.

Brad Ricca will be at Carrico/Fort Thomas branch of Campbell County Public Library on Friday Nov 7 at 7pm.

Hatshepsut - the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty - successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods. Scholars have long speculated as to why her monuments were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her unprecedented rule.

Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power - and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.

On a cold, drizzly fall afternoon in 1958, a trio of duck hunters stumbled on the charred remains of Cincinnati resident Louise Bergen. When investigators learned that her estranged husband was living with an older divorcée, Edythe Klumpp, they wasted no time in questioning her. When she failed a lie detector test, Edythe spilled out a confession. Although it did not fit the physical evidence, she was found guilty and sentenced to death in the electric chair.

Governor Michael V. DiSalle put his political career on the line to save Edythe from the death penalty, personally interviewing the prisoner while she was under the influence of "truth serum." But was it the truth? Richard O Jones separates the facts from the fiction in this comprehensive book about the Klumpp murder in Cincinnati's Savage Seamstress: The Shocking Edythe Klumpp Murder Scandal.

From a manual for witch hunters written by King James himself in 1597, to court documents from the Salem witch trials of 1692, to newspaper coverage of a woman stoned to death on the streets of Philadelphia while the Continental Congress met, The Penguin Book of Witches is a treasury of historical accounts of accused witches that sheds light on the reality behind the legends.

Katherine Howe bings to life stories like that of Eunice Cole, tried for attacking a teenage girl with a rock and buried with a stake through her heart; Jane Jacobs, a Bostonian so often accused of witchcraft that she took her tormentors to court on charges of slander; and Increase Mather, an exorcism-performing minister famed for his knowledge of witches, this volume provides a unique tour through the darkest history of English and North American witchcraft.

Daniel James Brown tells the story of The Boys in the Boat, the University of Washington rowing team who won gold at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

Nearly a decade after announcing the last book in her multi-million selling Mitford Years series, Jan Karon has returned to the cherished North Carolina town for a new novel, Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good.

Cincinnati author Tamera Muente introduces her first novel, The Boy at the Museum. Arthur has landed a job at the most sensational museum in 1830s Cincinnati. Filled with curiosities, its most popular live exhibit is Enos, a boy born without legs. Arthur meets the boy’s widowed mother and the two become entangled in the museum's strange world.

Phil Nuxhall, official historian for Cincinnati’s Spring Grove Cemetery, followed up his successful photography book, Beauty in the Grove: Spring Grove Cemetery & Arboretum, with Stories in the Grove - 115 of his favorite stories from the second largest cemetery in the country.  Nuxhall's collection includes tales of Wild Bill Hickok's wife, the man who changed Doris Kappelhoff's name to Doris Day, Babe Ruth's manager, the inventor of the oven window, and more. 

  Dan Wright, owner of OTR's Senate, offers a peek behind the scenes of his restaurant and his life with his book Senate: Street & Savory.  Favorite recipes, including his popular gourmet hot dogs, are featured along with cooking techniques and tips.