books

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience.

As the story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive. 



A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

There is also a sequel now available: Hollow City: The Second Novel of miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children.

Hatshepsut - the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty - successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods. Scholars have long speculated as to why her monuments were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her unprecedented rule.

Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power - and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.

On a cold, drizzly fall afternoon in 1958, a trio of duck hunters stumbled on the charred remains of Cincinnati resident Louise Bergen. When investigators learned that her estranged husband was living with an older divorcée, Edythe Klumpp, they wasted no time in questioning her. When she failed a lie detector test, Edythe spilled out a confession. Although it did not fit the physical evidence, she was found guilty and sentenced to death in the electric chair.

Governor Michael V. DiSalle put his political career on the line to save Edythe from the death penalty, personally interviewing the prisoner while she was under the influence of "truth serum." But was it the truth? Richard O Jones separates the facts from the fiction in this comprehensive book about the Klumpp murder in Cincinnati's Savage Seamstress: The Shocking Edythe Klumpp Murder Scandal.

From a manual for witch hunters written by King James himself in 1597, to court documents from the Salem witch trials of 1692, to newspaper coverage of a woman stoned to death on the streets of Philadelphia while the Continental Congress met, The Penguin Book of Witches is a treasury of historical accounts of accused witches that sheds light on the reality behind the legends.

Katherine Howe bings to life stories like that of Eunice Cole, tried for attacking a teenage girl with a rock and buried with a stake through her heart; Jane Jacobs, a Bostonian so often accused of witchcraft that she took her tormentors to court on charges of slander; and Increase Mather, an exorcism-performing minister famed for his knowledge of witches, this volume provides a unique tour through the darkest history of English and North American witchcraft.

Daniel James Brown tells the story of The Boys in the Boat, the University of Washington rowing team who won gold at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

Nearly a decade after announcing the last book in her multi-million selling Mitford Years series, Jan Karon has returned to the cherished North Carolina town for a new novel, Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good.

Cincinnati author Tamera Muente introduces her first novel, The Boy at the Museum. Arthur has landed a job at the most sensational museum in 1830s Cincinnati. Filled with curiosities, its most popular live exhibit is Enos, a boy born without legs. Arthur meets the boy’s widowed mother and the two become entangled in the museum's strange world.

Phil Nuxhall, official historian for Cincinnati’s Spring Grove Cemetery, followed up his successful photography book, Beauty in the Grove: Spring Grove Cemetery & Arboretum, with Stories in the Grove - 115 of his favorite stories from the second largest cemetery in the country.  Nuxhall's collection includes tales of Wild Bill Hickok's wife, the man who changed Doris Kappelhoff's name to Doris Day, Babe Ruth's manager, the inventor of the oven window, and more. 

  Dan Wright, owner of OTR's Senate, offers a peek behind the scenes of his restaurant and his life with his book Senate: Street & Savory.  Favorite recipes, including his popular gourmet hot dogs, are featured along with cooking techniques and tips.

John Scalzi: Lock In

Oct 10, 2014

  Hugo Award-winning author John Scalzi talks with Mark Perzel about his new novel, Lock In, a near future thriller.

During the interview, Scalzi mentions that there is a discussion going on in science fiction about whether science fiction is a genre or a mode. That is- is it a very specific type of writing that has to be done in a specific way, or is it a wider sort of trope that you can put other genres into? What do you think? Let us know by joining the conversation on the WVXU Facebook page.

Provided, Lisa Alther

NOTE: This interview originally aired March 7, 2014

  

Blood Feud: The Hatfields and the McCoys

 

The Book Club @ 91.7

Sep 15, 2014

Maureen Corrigan, who can be heard reviewing books on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross, may have said it best: “It's not that I don't like people. It's just that when I'm in the company of others - even my nearest and dearest - there always comes a moment when I'd rather be reading a book.”

  Jacob Dolson Cox was a divinity student, Ohio governor, University of Cincinnati president, attorney, a contemporary of James A. Garfield and James Monroe, military historian, and a battlefield commander in the Union Army, rising to the rank of major general. A new biography of prominent Ohioan Jacob Dolson Cox by Eugene Schmiel reveals for the first time Cox’s remarkable Civil War service. Dr. Schmiel joins us to discuss his new book, Citizen-General: Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era.

  THE BOYS IN THE BOAT: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, by Daniel James Brown, tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. Daniel James Brown joined us to talk about the improbable story of nine working-class boys from the American west who beat the odds and found hope in the most desperate of times.

A Boy and a Jaguar

Jul 11, 2014
Provided, Panthera

  Dr. Alan Rabinowitz is one of the world’s leading big cat experts, and has been called ‘The Indiana Jones of Wildlife Conservation’ by TIME Magazine. He has traveled the world on behalf of wildlife conservation and is responsible for the world's first jaguar sanctuary, the Cockscomb Basin Jaguar Preserve in the mountains of Belize. The Cincinnati Zoo’s Thane Maynard had a chance to talk with Alan Rabinowitz about his work, and A Boy and a Jaguar, his picture book that tells the real-life story of his own childhood.

Provided, Patrick Burke

  Patrick Burke, CPA, attorney and author, says everyone has  a number, that number, if invested wisely, that results in zero financial worries for the rest of your life. The number that provides “exit velocity” from the gravitational pull of your financial needs. A number, he says, few of us will reach in traditional salaried jobs.

Provided, Triumph Books

 

Provided, Clerisy Press

Local award-winning freelance writer and editor Wendy Hart Beckman joins us to discuss her latest book, Founders and Famous Families Cincinnati, a Who's Who, and a When and Where, of Cincinnati's origins. John Cleves Symmes, President Benjamin Harrison, Nicholas Longworth, Founders tells their stories and more, including details about our city’s many firsts, from the first professional baseball team to the first concrete skyscraper. On Wednesday, May 28 as part of the Cincinnati Museum Center's Insights Lecture Series, Ms. Beckman will be presenting: A Glass of Wine, a Loaf of Bread and Wow!: Nicholas Longworth’s Many Contributions to Cincinnati. For more information, click here.

Provided, Chicago Review Press

In September, 1955 Emma Gatewood became the first woman to hike the entire Appalachian Trail alone, as well as the first person, man or woman, to walk it twice, and three times. Grandma Gatewood, as reporters called her, started her first hike along the trail after telling her family she was going out for a walk. The next anybody heard from her she had hiked the first 800 miles of the 2,050-mile trail. Ben Montgomery, enterprise reporter for the Tampa Bay Times and founder of the narrative journalism website Gangrey.com, scoured Emma Gatewood’s diaries, trail journals and correspondence, and interviewed surviving family members and people she met along her hike, to unveil the story behind this 67-year old grandmother and her journeys. He talks with us about his book, Grandma Gatewood's Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail.

Provided, jefferyarnett.com

Only 20% of 18 to 29-year-olds were married in 2010, compared with 59% in 1960, and 40% of 18 to 34-year-olds are living with their parents, even though most would prefer to be on their own. GETTING TO 30: A Parent's Guide to the 20-Something Years is designed to help parents manage this new reality. Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, research professor in the Department of Psychology at Clark University, co-authored the book with Elizabeth Fishel,  he joins us to explore ways parents can successfully meet the challenges of emerging adulthood

Provided, gabriellezevin.com

  

Gabrielle Zevin’s latest novel, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, is a love letter to the world of books, and booksellers, that changes our lives by giving us the stories that open our hearts and enlighten our minds. Garbrielle Zevin joins us, along with Craig Popelars, director of Marketing with Algonquin Books, and Michael Link, Author and Publisher coordinator at Joseph-Beth Booksellers, to discuss the novel, and how a book makes it from manuscript to your reading table. Gabrielle Zevin will be doing a book signing at Josepth-Beth in Rookwood at 7:00 this evening.

  Experts agree teaching children about money early is the best way to prepare them to make informed financial decisions as adults, but few schools have financial literacy programs, and parents don’t often talk to their kids about money. Patrick Burke, CPA, attorney and managing partner at the law firm Burke & Schindler, has published a new book to help children understand economics.

Provided, Anabelle Gurwitch

Every seven and a half seconds, someone in America turns 50. While some people like to say “50 is the new 40,” actress/comedienne/writer Annabelle Gurwitch disagrees. In her new collection of essays, I SEE YOU MADE AN EFFORT, Gurwitch explores the hazards of reaching the half century mark. She shares some of the incites she’s had on reaching the big 5-0.

  In his new book, Stories in the Grove, historian and author Phil Nuxhall takes readers on a personal tour of his favorite 115 people, places and things at Spring Grove Cemetery & Arboretum.  You’ll learn about Babe Ruth’s manager, Wild Bill Hickok’s wife, the oven window inventor, and dozens of others who make Spring Grove the “go-to” cemetery.

Provided, Mary Roach

Provided, Elizabeth Cline

Provided, Simon and Schuster

  How did one obscure song become an international anthem for human triumph and tragedy, a song each successive generation seems to feel they have discovered and claimed as uniquely their own? Celebrated music journalist Alan Light follows the improbable journey of “Hallelujah” straight to the heart of popular culture in his book, “The Holy or the Broken.” Mark Perzel talked with Alan Light about “Hallelujah,” and its unlikely ascent.

Provided, Harper Collins


Provided

Many Americans tend to think of the Civil War as more glorious and less awful than its reality. In Living Hell: The Dark Side of the Civil War, Northern Kentucky University Regents Professor of History Emeritus Dr. Michael C. C. Adams gathers the voices of those who were on the firing line or in the hospital ward to create a far more realistic, and brutal, picture of the war. Dr. Adams is presenting a lecture on his work at 3 PM, April 10, in the Griffin Hall George and Ellen Rieveschl Digitorium on the NKU campus. For more information, call the NKU Department of History and Geography at (859) 572-5461.

Pages