books

The new book, Walking Cincinnati, by Danny Korman and Katie Meyer, is a guide through the historical, architectural, and culinary sites in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The book focuses on the human-interest stories connected with the places noted along the book’s 32 walking tours, and unveils some of the more fascinating aspects of Greater Cincinnati. 

 

 The Emmy-award winning Orange is the New Black, based on Piper Kerman’s memoir of the same name, depicts her arrest, conviction and incarceration for drug-trafficking. But the book and Netflix series are from only Kerman’s perspective. Now, Cleary Wolters, the real life Alex Vause from the show, tells her side of the story in a new book, Out of Orange. She joins us to discuss her experiences.

Provided / Campbell County Public Library

Campbell County is joining in the Little Library craze.

Forty shelters for free books will soon begin popping up around the county thanks to a program from the public library. Community members could buy the boxes for ten dollars and then were asked to decorate them. They're often placed in neighborhoods or outside someone's home.

Council member Ryan Salzman helped get Bellevue involved. He thinks it's the simplicity that draws people to the Little Libraries.

  The Society of Friends, more commonly known as the Quakers, came to Ohio in the late 1700s and early 1800s. The Quakers played a major role in nineteenth-century reform efforts including the temperance, women's rights, and abolition movements.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County has released a list of the most popular books in 2014.  They are the titles that were checked out most often between January and November of this year.  (December’s numbers weren’t available.)

Top 10  Adult Book Titles:

1.       Top Secret Twenty-one by Janet Evanovich

2.       Invisible by James Patterson 

3.       The Target by David Baldacci

4.       Unlucky 13 by James Patterson 

5.       The Collector by Nora Roberts 

6.       A Star for Mrs. Blake by April Smith 

  1. Michael Link is reading Station 11 by Emily St.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience.

As the story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive. 



A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

There is also a sequel now available: Hollow City: The Second Novel of miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children.

Drawing on ten years of research in the trenches of Cleveland libraries, boarded-up high schools, and secret, private collections, and a love of comic books, Brad Ricca's Super Boys is the first ever full biography about Superman's creators.

Among scores of new discoveries, the book reveals the first stories and pictures ever published by the two, where the first Superman story really came from, the real inspiration for Lois Lane, the template for Superman's costume, and much, much more. Super Boys also tracks the boys' unknown, often mysterious lives after they left Superman, including Siegel's secret work during World War II and never-before-seen work from Shuster.

Brad Ricca will be at Carrico/Fort Thomas branch of Campbell County Public Library on Friday Nov 7 at 7pm.

Hatshepsut - the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty - successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods. Scholars have long speculated as to why her monuments were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her unprecedented rule.

Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power - and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.

On a cold, drizzly fall afternoon in 1958, a trio of duck hunters stumbled on the charred remains of Cincinnati resident Louise Bergen. When investigators learned that her estranged husband was living with an older divorcée, Edythe Klumpp, they wasted no time in questioning her. When she failed a lie detector test, Edythe spilled out a confession. Although it did not fit the physical evidence, she was found guilty and sentenced to death in the electric chair.

Governor Michael V. DiSalle put his political career on the line to save Edythe from the death penalty, personally interviewing the prisoner while she was under the influence of "truth serum." But was it the truth? Richard O Jones separates the facts from the fiction in this comprehensive book about the Klumpp murder in Cincinnati's Savage Seamstress: The Shocking Edythe Klumpp Murder Scandal.

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