book

  Chuck Klosterman, “The Ethicist” for The New York Times Magazine,has walked into the darkness. In his latest book, I Wear the Black Hat, he questions the modern understanding of villainy. What do we mean when we say someone is a bad person? And why are we so obsessed with the antihero in films, TV and books? The New York Times bestselling author of seven previous books, including Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, joins us to explain his take on the bad guy.

Sports historian Scott Rowan has written a fascinating book looking at the ways the Chicago Cubs have altered politics, society, race relations, innovation, entertainment, vices and baseball. He’s on the phone with Mark Heyne to talk about The Cubs Quotient: How the Chicago Cubs Changed the World.

  Western Female Seminary, which opened its doors in 1855, later became Western College for Women. The first college in the country to have an artist-in-residence, Western attracted national attention when it hosted civil rights training for Freedom Summer 1964. In 1974, the college became part of Miami University in Oxford.

Possibly a first for Around Cincinnati: our interview with local author and Vietnam veteran Rod Jordan has a surprise ending. His book, Welcome to the Nam, talks about his time in country as a grunt in the Marines and how the death and devastation he witnessed has stuck with him his entire life. Brian O’Donnell talks with the author about why he finally decided to write the book, and sets up the final surprise.

  

 

Kate Sweeney, a producer for NPR, has just released her fascinating book, American Afterlife: Encounters in the Customs of Mourning, and she’s on the phone with Lee Hay to share what she learned about visiting cemeteries on Memorial Day, green cemeteries, roadside memorials and more.

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