book

The Adventures of Henry Thoreau: A Young Man's Unlikely Path to Walden Pond tells the story of how the young man who had trouble holding a job became an early voice in the environmental movement. The author, Michael Sims, is on the phone with our Kelly Blewett to talk about Thoreau’s early years, before Walden Pond.

  For a long time, in most parts of the world, people saw Americans as cowboys. Mainly because that'’s how we saw ourselves. From 1955 to 1964, adult Westerns made up as much as 25% of all prime-time television. Wagon Train, Maverick, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, and dozens of other programs painted the rough justice of the American West. At least the popular version of it.

On Highway 61 is the new book from Dennis McNally, subtitled Music, Race, and the Evolution of Cultural Freedom, and he’s on the phone with David Lewis to talk about the importance of music during the 1960’s civil rights turbulence.

  

Cincinnati and WWII

Dec 8, 2014

  Sunday marked the 73rd anniversary of the attack on Peal Harbor, which brought America into World War II.

Author Anne Valente has released a new collection of her short stories entitled By Light We Knew Our Names, and she’s with our Kelly Blewett to talk about the connective theme of the stories, why she dedicated the book to her parents and her recent Huffington Post piece about young adult books for adults.

  Comedian and author Steven Dupin, better known as Stevie D, was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the age of 44. The self-described "“hillbilly hellraiser"” from Owensboro, Kentucky was scared, and decided the only way he was going to survive was to keep his sense of humor. So he wrote a book about his experience, from diagnosis through treatment and beyond.

Just in time for your Halloween road trip is the new book, America’s Most Haunted: The Secrets of Famous Paranormal Places, which includes Bobby Mackey’s nightclub in Wilder, Kentucky. Co-author Eric Olsen was in town recently and spoke with Lee Hay about putting the book together and his travels to seek out the scariest places in the country.

  David Wecker is one of Cincinnati’'s long-time storytellers, having spent more than 20 years writing for The Cincinnati Post and The Kentucky Post. He has also authored several books, co-hosted a radio show, and now with his company BrandFlick, continues telling stories. David Wecker joins us to discuss his latest book, Square Pegs: Stories about Everything and Nothing, a collection from the columns he wrote for The Post newspapers.

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