bicycling

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

With the opening of six stations in Covington last Tuesday, Red Bike is now available on both sides of the Ohio River and now has 50 stations in Greater Cincinnati. Since its launch last September, more than 46,000 rides have been logged on Red Bike.

Kentucky 49th in bike friendliness

May 13, 2015

A national bicycling-advocacy group says Kentucky ranks 49th among the 50 states in "bike friendliness."

The League of American Bicyclists’ annual report ranks states on criteria such as policy, legal and safety protections and roadway infrastructure.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council could vote Wednesday to apply for up to $29 million in federal money to fund the Wasson Way Commuter Trail Network.  

It is a proposed shared-use path for bikes and pedestrians along an unused rail line running through several eastside city neighborhoods. 

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Since last July, there have been protected bicycle lanes on a portion of Central Parkway near downtown Cincinnati.   And some people have expressed concerns about the safety of the lanes.  

Bill Johnson owns a business along Central Parkway and is also an avid cyclist.  He said there have been a lot problems with the bike lanes.  He said it has made it more dangerous both for cars and cyclists.

Six Cincinnati Council Members are ready to ask city officials to focus their attention on building a bike and walking trail along the Oasis railroad line instead of a similar project along the Ohio River.  

A committee approved the motion Tuesday and the full council could vote on it Wednesday.  

Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune spoke at the meeting.  He said many officials want a trail built from downtown to the east side, but he said the city shouldn't limit the work.

Jay Hanselman

Update 07/29/14 at 2:30 pm:  Drivers on Central Parkway may also notice some spots along the route now feature bright green paint on the roadway.

A city official said the paint is “to alert motorists and bicyclists that their paths may be crossing at these locations.”  The official said Liberty Street is a great example, where lots of people are turning onto and off of Liberty where it intersects with Central Parkway.

Cincinnati officials are holding a public hearing Wednesday evening on a western portion of the Ohio River Trail.  

The city has a feasibility study on the nearly four-mile long component that would run through Lower Price Hill, Sedamsville, Riverside and Sayler Park.  This portion of the bike, running and walking trail would generally be located from the Evans Recreational Area near the Mill Creek to Gilday Riverside Playfield.

Evendale is the latest community to develop a master plan for increasing bicycle and pedestrian transportation in the village.  

Recreation Director David Nichols said the village council unanimously approved the proposal Tuesday night.  He said it will be good for residents.

Cincinnati is getting $1 million from the federal government for bike trails.  The funds come from the Transportation Alternatives program from the U.S. Department of Transportation.  

A city press release said half of the money will be used to expand a West Side bicycle route to make it easier for students to get to school.  The rest will be used to repair potholes on the Lunken Trail along Wilmer Avenue.

The Westwood Trail will create a “Safe Routes to School” connection with Western Hills High School.

UPDATE:

Cincinnati Vice Mayor David Mann says he doesn't have enough votes yet for a motion that would save a plan to add protected bike lines to Central Parkway.

City council met in special session Thursday afternoon for the first reading of an ordinance that would kill the plan. Second readings of the ordinance are scheduled for this morning and next Tuesday, when a decision would be made.

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